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February 16, 2016

Tricia Mason With great sadness, the Access Board announces the death of former Board member and chair Tricia Mason of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina after a brief illness. Appointed to the Board in April 2005 by President George W. Bush, Mason was elected its chair two years later. She was active in the Board’s development of accessibility guidelines and represented the agency on the Election Assistance Commission’s Board of Advisors and Technical Guidelines Development Committee. Her term as a Board member ended in September 2008.

“During her time on the Board and throughout her entire career, Tricia dedicated herself to promoting accessibility for all,” stated David M. Capozzi, the Access Board’s Executive Director. “Her mastery of disability policy and accessible design combined with her strong commitment to inclusiveness made her an exceptional advocate on behalf of people with disabilities.”

Mason served for almost seven years as Deputy Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services where she oversaw provision of community-based developmental disability services throughout the state. More recently, she worked as a consultant to agencies on serving individuals with developmental disabilities and as a product management director at Anthem, Inc.

She also was a former president of the Little People of America, an advocacy organization for individuals of short stature and their families. She represented the organization on the American National Standards Institute A117 Committee which maintains accessibility standards for buildings and facilities that are referenced by the International Building Code.

Mason grew up in in Cheyenne, Wyoming where early in her career she chaired the Mayor's Council for People with Disabilities. She also served as a community programs specialist for the Wyoming Governor's Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities and later moved to Washington, D.C. to work at Easter Seals and TASH, a disability rights organization for people with significant disabilities and support needs.