CHAPTER 5:  REVISIONS THAT REDUCE IMPACTS 

5.0  Introduction

 

This chapter discusses revisions to the scoping and technical requirements that will reduce impacts on the new construction and alterations of facilities.  Some of the revisions will significantly reduce impacts, such as the revised scoping requirements for wheelchair spaces and assistive listening systems in large assembly areas, and the exceptions for accessible routes to small press boxes.  The relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines is presented in tables.  Unless otherwise noted, the current guidelines refer to ADAAG.  The requirements are presented in the order in which they appear in the final revised guidelines.  Scoping and technical requirements are presented together, where appropriate.  The text of the final revised guidelines that will reduce the impacts is underlined.  Where the current guidelines contain related text, it is also underlined.  Equivalent requirements in the International Building Code and the ICC/ANSI A117.1 Standard on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities are also noted in the tables.[76]

5.1  Limited Access Spaces and Machinery Spaces

 

Table 5.1 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the exceptions for limited access spaces and machinery spaces.

 

Table 5.1 – Limited Access Spaces and Machinery Spaces (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.1  Application.  . . .

 

(5)  General Exceptions. . . .

 

(b)  Accessibility is not required to or in: . . .

 

(ii)  non-occupiable spaces accessed only by ladders, catwalks, crawl spaces, very narrow passageways, tunnels, or freight (non-passenger) elevators, and frequented only by service personnel for maintenance, repair, or occasional monitoring of equipment; such spaces may include, but are not limited to, elevator pits, elevator penthouses, piping or equipment catwalks, water or sewage treatment pump rooms and stations, electric substations and transformer vaults, and highway and tunnel facilities; . . .

203.4 Limited Access Spaces.  Spaces accessed only by ladders, catwalks, crawl spaces, or very narrow passageways shall not be required to comply with these requirements or to be on an accessible route.

 

203.5  Machinery Spaces.  Spaces frequented only by service personnel for maintenance, repair, or occasional monitoring of equipment shall not be required to comply with these requirements or to be on an accessible route.  Machinery spaces include, but are not limited to, elevator pits or elevator pent-houses; mechanical, electrical, or communications equipment rooms; piping or equipment catwalks; water or sewage treatment pump rooms and stations; electrical substations and transformer vaults; and highway and traffic tunnel facilities.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Sections 1103.2.8 and 1103.2.9 have similar exceptions for limited access spaces and machinery spaces.

 

IBC 2003:  Sections 1103.2.8 and 1103.2.9 have similar exceptions for limited access spaces and machinery spaces.

The current guidelines contain an exception that exempts “non-occupiable” spaces that have limited means of access, such as ladders or very narrow passageways, and that are visited only by service personnel for maintenance, repair, or occasional monitoring of equipment from all accessibility requirements.  The final revised guidelines expand this exception by removing the condition that the exempt spaces be “non-occupiable,” and by separating the other conditions into two independent exceptions: one for spaces with limited means of access, and the other for machinery spaces.  More spaces are exempted by these exceptions to the final revised guidelines.

 

5.2  Operable Parts[77]

 

Table 5.2 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping and technical requirements for operable parts.

 

Table 5.2 – Operable Parts (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(13)  Controls and operating mechanisms in accessible spaces, along accessible routes, or as parts of accessible elements (for example, light switches and dispenser controls) shall comply with 4.27.

 

4.27.3  Height.  The highest operable part of controls, dispensers, receptacles, and other operable equipment shall be placed within at least one of the reach ranges specified in 4.2.5 and 4.2.6.  Electrical and communications systems receptacles on walls shall be mounted no less than 15 in (380 mm) above the floor.

Exception:  These requirements do not apply where the use of special equipment dictates otherwise or where electrical and communica-tions systems receptacles are not normally intended for use by building occupants.

 

4.27.4  Operation.  Controls and operating mechanisms shall be operable with one hand and shall not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist.  The force required to activate controls shall be no greater than 5 lbf (22.5N).

205.1  General.  Operable parts on accessible elements, accessible routes, and in accessible rooms and spaces shall comply with 309.

Exceptions: 1.  Operable parts that are intended for use only by service or maintenance personnel shall not be required to comply with 309.

2.  Electrical or communication receptacles serving a dedicated use shall not be required to comply with 309.

3.  Where two or more outlets are provided in a kitchen above a length of counter top that is uninterrupted by a sink or appliance, one outlet shall not be required to comply with 309.

4.  Floor electrical receptacles shall not be required to comply with 309.

5.  HVAC diffusers shall not be required to comply with 309.

6.  Except for light switches, where redundant controls are provided for a single element, one control in each space shall not be required to comply with 309. . . .

 

309.3  Height.  Operable parts shall be placed within one or more of the reach ranges specified in 308.

 

309.4  Operation.  Operable parts shall be operable with one hand and shall not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist.  The force required to activate operable parts shall be 5 pounds (22.2 N) maximum.

Exception:  Gas pump nozzles shall not be required to provide operable parts that have an activating force of 5 pounds (22.2 N) maximum.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1108.13 has an equivalent requirement for operable parts, but no exceptions.  Section 1103.2.12 exempts gas pumps from accessibility requirements.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.13 has an equivalent requirement for operable parts and equivalent exceptions.  Section 1103.2.14 requires operable parts on gas pumps to comply with the technical requirement for height. 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require operable parts on accessible elements, along accessible routes, and in accessible rooms and spaces to comply with the technical requirements for operable parts, including height and operation.  The current guidelines contain an exception that exempts “special equipment [that] dictates otherwise,” and electrical and communications systems receptacles not intended for use by building occupants from the technical requirement for height.  The final revised guidelines divide this exception into three new exceptions covering operable parts intended only for use by service or maintenance personnel; electrical or communication receptacles serving a dedicated use; and floor electrical receptacles.  Operable parts covered by these new exceptions are exempt from all the technical requirements for operable parts.  The final revised guidelines add new exceptions that exempt certain outlets at kitchen counters; HVAC diffusers; and redundant controls provided for a single element, other than light switches, from the technical requirements for operable parts.  The final revised guidelines also exempt gas pump nozzles from the technical requirement for activating force.

 

5.3  Accessible Routes from Site Arrival Points and Within Sites

 

Table 5.3 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirements for accessible routes from site arrival points and within sites.

 

Table 5.3 – Accessible Routes from Site Arrival Points and Within Sites (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.2  Accessible Sites and Exterior Facilities: New Construction.  An accessible site shall meet the following minimum requirements:

 

(1)  At least one accessible route complying with 4.3 shall be provided within the boundary of the site from public transportation stops, accessible parking spaces, passenger loading zones if provided, and public streets or sidewalks, to an accessible building entrance.

 

(2)  At least one accessible route complying with 4.3 shall connect accessible buildings, accessible facilities, accessible elements, and accessible spaces that are on the same site.

 

 

206.2.1  Site Arrival Points.  At least one accessible route shall be provided within the site from accessible parking spaces and accessible passenger loading zones; public streets and sidewalks; and public transportation stops to the accessible building or facility entrance they serve.

Exceptions: . . .

2.  An accessible route shall not be required between site arrival points and the building or facility entrance if the only means of access between them is a vehicular way not providing pedestrian access.

 

206.2.2  Within a Site.  At least one accessible route shall connect accessible buildings, accessible facilities, accessible elements, and accessible spaces that are on the same site.

Exception:  An accessible route shall not be required between accessible buildings, accessible facilities, accessible elements, and accessible spaces if the only means of access between them is a vehicular way not providing pedestrian access.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Sections 1104.1 and 1104.2 have equivalent requirements for accessible routes from site arrival points and within sites, and an equivalent exception for vehicular ways within sites.

 

IBC 2003:  Sections 1104.1 and 1104.2 have equivalent requirements for accessible routes from site arrival points and within sites, and equivalent exceptions for vehicular ways from site arrival points and within sites.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require at least one accessible route to be provided from site arrival points to an accessible building entrance, and at least one accessible route to connect accessible facilities on the same site.  The final revised guidelines add two new exceptions that exempt site arrival points and accessible facilities within a site from the accessible route requirements where the only means of access between them is a vehicular way that does not provide pedestrian access.

5.4  Accessible Routes to Tiered Dining Areas in Sports Facilities

 

Table 5.4 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for accessible routes to dining areas.

 

Table 5.4 – Accessible Routes to Dining Areas (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements:

 

(1)  At least one accessible route complying with 4.3 shall connect accessible building or facility entrances with all accessible spaces and elements within the building or facility.

 

5.4  Dining Areas.  In new construction, all dining areas, including raised or sunken dining areas, loggias, and outdoor seating areas shall be accessible. . . .

206.2.5  Restaurants and Cafeterias.  In restaurants and cafeterias, an accessible route shall be provided to all dining areas, including raised or sunken dining areas, and outdoor dining areas.

 

Exceptions: . . .

3.  In sports facilities, tiered dining areas providing seating required to comply with 221 shall be required to have accessible routes serving at least 25 percent of the dining area provided that accessible routes serve seating complying with 221and each tier is provided with the same services.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1107.2.5 has an equivalent requirement for accessible routes to dining areas, but no exception for tiered dining areas in sports facilities.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1108.2.9 has an equivalent requirement for dining areas and an equivalent exception for tiered dining areas in sports facilities.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require an accessible route to be provided to all dining areas, including raised or sunken dining areas.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for tiered dining areas in sports facilities.  Dining areas in sports facilities are typically integrated into the seating bowl and are tiered to provide adequate lines of sight.  The new exception requires an accessible route to be provided to at least 25 percent of the tiered dining areas in sports facilities.  Each tier must have the same services and the accessible route must serve the accessible seating.

5.5  Accessible Routes to Press Boxes

 

Table 5.5 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for accessible routes to press boxes.

 

Table 5.5 – Accessible Routes to Press Boxes (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.1  Application.

(1)  General.  All areas of newly designed or newly constructed buildings and facilities and altered portions of existing buildings and facilities shall comply with section 4, unless otherwise provided in this section or as modified in a special application section.

 

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements:

 

(1)  At least one accessible route complying with 4.3 shall connect accessible building or facility entrances with all accessible spaces and elements within the building or facility.

206.2.7  Press Boxes.  Press boxes in assembly areas shall be on an accessible route.

Exceptions: 1.  An accessible route shall not be required to press boxes in bleachers that have points of entry at only one level provided that the aggregate area of all press boxes is 500 square feet (46 m2) maximum.

2.  An accessible route shall not be required to free-standing press boxes that are elevated above grade 12 feet (3660 mm) minimum provided that the aggregate area of all press boxes is 500 square feet (46 m2) maximum.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  No requirement for accessible routes to press boxes.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1104.3.2 has an equivalent requirement for accessible routes to press boxes and equivalent exceptions for small press boxes.

 

The current guidelines require all areas of newly constructed facilities to be accessible, and an accessible route to connect accessible entrances with all accessible spaces and elements within the facility.  The final revised guidelines add two new exceptions that exempt small press boxes that are located on bleachers with entrances on only one level, and small press boxes that are free-standing structures elevated more than 12 feet, from the accessible route requirement when the aggregate area of all press boxes in a sports facility does not exceed 500 square feet.  These new exceptions significantly reduce the impacts on high school sports facilities.

5.6  Shower and Sauna Doors in Hotel Guest Rooms

 

Table 5.6 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for doors in hotel guest rooms.

 

Table 5.6 – Shower and Sauna Doors in Hotel Guest Rooms (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

9.4  Other Sleeping Rooms and Suites.  Doors and doorways designed to allow passage into and within all sleeping units or other covered units shall comply with 4.13.5.

206.5.3  Transient Lodging Facilities.  In transient lodging facilities, entrances, doors, and doorways providing user passage into and within guest rooms that are not required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2 shall comply with 404.2.3.

Exception:  Shower and sauna doors in guest rooms that are not required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2 shall not be required to comply with 404.2.3.

 

224.1.2  Guest Room Doors and Doorways.  Entrances, doors, and doorways providing user passage into and within guest rooms that are not required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2 shall comply with 404.2.3.

Exception:  Shower and sauna doors in guest rooms that are not required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2 shall not be required to comply with 404.2.3.

Model Codes & Standards

No requirement for doors in guest rooms that are not required to provide mobility features.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require doors in hotel guest rooms that do not provide mobility features to have at least 32 inches clear width.[78]  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts shower and sauna doors from the requirement.

5.7  Limited-Use/Limited-Application Elevators and Private Residence Elevators

 

Table 5.7 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirements for elevators.

 

Table 5.7 – Limited-Use/Limited-Application Elevators and Private Residence Elevators (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(5)  One passenger elevator complying with 4.10 shall serve each level, including mezzanines, in all multistory buildings and facilities unless exempted below. . . .

Exception 1:  Elevators are not required in:

(a)  private facilities that are less than three stories or that have less than 3000 square feet per story unless the building is a shopping center, a shopping mall, or the professional office of a health care provider, or another type of facility as determined by the Attorney General; or

 (b)  public facilities that are less than three stories and that are not open to the general public if the story above or below the accessible ground floor houses no more than five persons and is less than 500 square feet . . . .

 

In new construction, if a building or facility is eligible for exemption but a passenger elevator is nonetheless planned, that elevator shall meet the requirements of 4.10 and shall serve each level in the building. . . .

206.2.3  Multi-Story Buildings and Facilities.  At least one accessible route shall connect each story and mezzanine in multi-story buildings and facilities.

Exceptions: 1.  In private buildings or facilities that are less than three stories or that have less than 3000 square feet per story (279 m²), an accessible route shall not be required to connect stories provided the building or facility is not a shopping center, a shopping mall, the professional office of a health care provider, a terminal, depot or other station used for specified public transportation, an airport passenger terminal, or another type of facility as determined by the Attorney General.

2.  Where a two story public building or facility has one story with an occupant load of five or fewer persons that does not contain public use space, that story shall not be required to be connected to the story above or below. . . .

 

206.6  Elevators.  Elevators provided for passengers shall comply with 407. . . .

Exceptions: 1.  In a building or facility permitted to use the exceptions to 206.2.3 or permitted by 206.7 to use a platform lift, elevators complying with 408 shall be permitted.

2. Elevators complying with 408 or 409 shall be permitted in multi-story residential dwelling units.

 

[Note: Section 408 contains technical requirements for limited-use/limited-application (LULA) elevators.  Section 409 contains technical requirements for private residence elevators.]

    Model Codes & Standards  

IBC 2000:  No exception permitting LULA elevators.  Section 1107.5.4 requires Type A dwelling units to comply with the ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998 standard, which contains technical requirements for private residence elevators in Type A dwelling units.

 

IBC 2003:  No exception permitting LULA elevators.  Section 1107.2 requires Type A dwelling units to comply with the ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998 standard, which contains technical requirements for private residence elevators in Type A dwelling units.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines include exceptions to the scoping requirement for accessible routes that exempt certain facilities from connecting each story with an elevator.  If a facility is exempt from the scoping requirement, but nonetheless installs an elevator, the current guidelines require the elevator to comply with the technical requirements for passenger elevators.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that allows a facility that is exempt from the scoping requirement to install a limited-use/limited-application (LULA) elevator.  LULA elevators are typically less expensive than passenger elevators, and are suitable for low-traffic, low-rise facilities.  LULA elevators are also permitted as an alternative to platform lifts.  The final revised guidelines also add a new exception that permits private residence elevators in multi-story dwelling units.  The final revised guidelines contain technical requirements for LULA elevators and private residence elevators.

 

5.8  Platform Lifts in Hotel Guest Rooms and Dwelling Units

 

Table 5.8 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for platform lifts.

 

Table 5.8 – Platform Lifts in Hotel Guest Rooms and Dwelling Units (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(5)  One passenger elevator complying with 4.10 shall serve each level, including mezzanines, in all multistory buildings and facilities unless exempted below. . . .

Exception 4:  Platform lifts (wheelchair lifts) complying with 4.11 of this guideline and applicable State or local codes may be used in lieu of an elevator only under the following conditions:

 

[Note: No exceptions for hotel guest rooms and dwelling units.]

206.7  Platform Lifts.  . . . Platform lifts shall be permitted as a component of an accessible route in new construction in accordance with 206.7.  . . .

 

206.7.6  Guest Rooms and Residential Dwelling Units.  Platform lifts shall be permitted to connect levels within transient lodging guest rooms required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2 or residential dwelling units required to provide mobility features complying with 809.2 through 809.4.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1108.7 has an equivalent requirement permitting platform lifts in dwelling units.  

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.7 has an equivalent requirement permitting platform lifts in hotel guest rooms and dwelling units.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines limit the places where platform lifts are permitted to be used as part of an accessible route in new construction.  The final revised guidelines add a new scoping requirement that permits platform lifts to be used in hotel guest rooms and dwelling units with mobility features.

5.9  Parking Spaces[79]

 

Table 5.9 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirements for parking spaces.

 

Table 5.9 – Parking Spaces (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.2  Accessible Sites and Exterior Facilities: New Construction.  An accessible site shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(5)(a)  If parking spaces are provided for self-parking by employees or visitors, or both, then accessible parking spaces complying with 4.6 shall be provided in each such parking area in conformance with the table below.  . . .

 

(7)  Building Signage: . . . Elements and spaces of accessible facilities which shall be identified by the International Symbol of Accessibility and which shall comply with 4.30.7 are:

 

(a)  Parking spaces designated as reserved for individuals with disabilities; . . . 

208.1  General.  Where parking spaces are provided, parking spaces shall be provided in accordance with 208.

Exception:  Parking spaces used exclusively for buses, trucks, other delivery vehicles, law enforcement vehicles, or vehicular impound shall not be required to comply with 208 provided that lots accessed by the public are provided with a passenger loading zone complying with 503.

 

216.5  Parking.  Parking spaces complying with 502 shall be identified by signs complying with 502.6

Exceptions: 1.  Where a total of four or fewer parking spaces, including accessible parking spaces, are provided on a site, identification of accessible parking spaces shall not be required.

2.  In residential facilities, where parking spaces are assigned to specific residential dwelling units, identification of accessible parking spaces shall not be required.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1106.1 has an equivalent requirement for the number of accessible parking spaces, but no exception.  Section 1109.1 has an equivalent requirement for identification of accessible parking spaces and a similar exception for sites with few parking spaces.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1106.1 has an equivalent requirement for the number of accessible parking spaces and a similar exception.  Section 1109.1 has an equivalent requirement for identification of accessible parking spaces and an equivalent exception for sites with few parking spaces.

 

Where parking spaces are provided, the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require a certain number of the parking spaces to be accessible.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts parking spaces used exclusively for buses, trucks, delivery vehicles, law enforcement vehicles, or for purposes of vehicular impound from the scoping requirement for parking spaces.  If a lot containing parking spaces for these vehicles is used by the public, the lot is required to have an accessible passenger loading zone. 

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require accessible parking spaces to be identified by signs that display the International Symbol of Accessibility.  The final revised guidelines add two new exceptions that exempt accessible parking spaces from the signage requirement.  The first exception exempts sites that have four or less parking spaces from the signage requirement.  This exception will reduce the impacts on small businesses.  The second exception exempts residential facilities where parking spaces are assigned to specific dwelling units from the signage requirement.

5.10     Passenger Loading Zones at Medical Care and Long-Term Care Facilities[80]

 

Table 5.10 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for passenger loading zones at medical care and long-term care facilities.

 

Table 5.10 – Passenger Loading Zones at Medical Care and Long-Term Care Facilities (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

6.1 General.  Medical care facilities included in this section are those in which people receive physical and medical treatment or care and where persons may need assistance in responding to an emergency and where the period of stay may exceed 24 hours.  In addition to the requirements of section 4, medical care . . . facilities shall comply with section 6.

6.2 Entrances.  At least one accessible entrance that complies with 4.14 shall be protected from the weather by canopy or roof overhang.  Such entrances shall incorporate a passenger loading zone that complies with 4.6.6.

209.3  Medical Care and Long-Term Care Facilities.  At least one passenger loading zone complying with 503 shall be provided at an accessible entrance to licensed medical care and licensed long-term care facilities where the period of stay exceeds twenty-four hours.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1106.6.1 has an equivalent requirement for passenger loading zones at medical care and long-term care facilities.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1106.7.2 has an equivalent requirement for passenger loading zones at medical care and long-term care facilities.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require medical care and long-term care facilities, where the period of stay exceeds 24 hours, to provide at least one passenger loading zone at an accessible entrance.  The current guidelines also require a canopy or roof overhang at the passenger loading zone.  The final revised guidelines do not require a canopy or roof overhang.

 

5.11     Aisle Stairs and Ramps in Assembly Areas

 

Table 5.11 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping and technical requirements for aisle stairs and ramps in assembly areas.

 

Table 5.11 – Aisle Stairs and Ramps in Assembly Areas (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(4)  Interior and exterior stairs connecting levels that are not connected by an elevator, ramp, or other accessible means of vertical access shall comply with 4.9.

 

4.9.4  Handrails.  Stairways shall have handrails at both sides of all stairs.  Handrails shall comply with 4.26 and shall have the following features:

 

(1)  Handrails shall be continuous along both sides of stairs. . . .

 

(2)  If handrails are not continuous, they shall extend at least 12 in (305 mm) beyond the top riser and at least 12 in (305 mm) plus the width of one thread beyond the bottom riser. . . .

 

4.8.1  General.  Any part of an accessible route with a slope greater than 1:20 shall be considered a ramp and shall comply with 4.8.

 

4.8.5  Handrails.  If a ramp run has a rise greater than 6 in (150 mm) or a horizontal projection greater than 72 in (150 mm), than it shall have handrails on both sides.  Handrails are not required on curb ramps or adjacent to seating in assembly areas.  Handrails shall comply with 4.26 and shall have the following features:

 

(1)  Handrails shall be provided along both sides of ramp segments. . . .

 

(2)  If handrails are not continuous, they shall extend at least 12 in (305 mm) beyond the top and bottom of the ramp segment and shall be parallel with the floor or ground surface (see Fig. 17). . . .

210.1  General.  Interior and exterior stairs that are part of a means of egress shall comply with 504.

Exceptions: . . .

3. In assembly areas, aisle stairs shall not be required to comply with 504.

 

[Note: Section 504 requires stairs to have handrails complying with 505.]

 

405.1  General.  Ramps on accessible routes shall comply with 405.

Exception:  In assembly areas, aisle ramps adjacent to seating and not serving elements required to be on an accessible route shall not be required to comply with 405.

 

405.8  Handrails.  Ramp runs with a rise greater than 6 inches (150 mm) shall have handrails complying with 505.

 

505.2  Where Required.  Handrails shall be provided on both sides of stairs and ramps.

Exception:  In assembly areas, handrails shall not be required on both sides of aisle ramps where a handrail is provided at either side or within the aisle width.

 

505.3  Continuity.  Handrails shall be continuous within the full length of each stair flight or ramp run. . . . .

Exception:  In assembly areas, handrails on ramps shall not be required to be continuous in aisles serving seating.

 

505.10  Handrail Extensions.  Handrail gripping surfaces shall extend beyond and in the same direction of stair flights and ramp runs in accordance with 505.10.

Exceptions: . . . 

2.  In assembly areas, extensions shall not be required for ramp handrails in aisles serving seating where the handrails are discontinuous to provide access to seating and to permit crossovers within aisles. . . .

Model Codes & Standards

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Sections 505.2, 505.3, and 505.10 have equivalent exceptions for aisle ramps in assembly areas with respect to handrail location, continuity, and extensions.

 

The current guidelines require stairs that connect levels not served by an elevator, ramp, or platform lift to comply with the technical requirements for stairs.  The final revised guidelines require stairs that are part of a means of egress to comply with the technical requirements for stairs.  The current guidelines do not contain any exceptions for aisle stairs in assembly areas.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts aisle stairs in assembly areas from the technical requirements for stairs, including handrails.

 

The current guidelines exempt aisle ramps adjacent to seating in assembly areas only from providing handrails.  The final revised guidelines exempt aisle ramps adjacent to seating in assembly areas, which do not serve accessible elements, from all the technical requirements for ramps.  Where aisle ramps in assembly areas serve accessible elements, the final revised guidelines exempt the aisle ramps from providing:

 

§    Handrails on both sides of an aisle ramp, where a handrail is provided at one side of the aisle ramp or within the aisle ramp.

 

§    Continuous handrails for the full length of an aisle ramp run.

 

§    Handrail extensions beyond an aisle ramp run, where there are breaks in the handrail to provide access to seating and to permit crossovers within the aisle.

 

5.12     Multiple Single User Toilet Rooms[81]

 

Table 5.12 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for toilet rooms.

 

Table 5.12 – Multiple Single User Toilet Rooms (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(11)  Toilet Facilities.  If toilet rooms are provided, then each public and common use toilet room shall comply with 4.22. . . .

213.2  Toilet and Bathing Rooms.  Where toilet rooms are provided, each toilet room shall comply with 603. . . .

Exceptions: . . . 

4.  Where multiple single user toilet rooms are clustered at a single location, no more than 50 percent of the single user toilet rooms for each use at each cluster shall be required to comply with 603.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1108.2 has a similar exception for multiple single user toilet rooms clustered at a single location.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.2 has a similar exception for multiple single user toilet rooms clustered at a single location.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require each toilet room to be accessible.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for multiple single user toilet rooms clustered at a single location.  The exception requires at least 50 percent of these toilet rooms to be accessible.  This exception will reduce the impacts on medical facilities where multiple single user toilet rooms are provided for specimen collection.

 

5.13     Urinals

 

Table 5.13 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for urinals.

 

Table 5.13 – Urinals (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.22.5  Urinals.  If urinals are provided, then at least one shall comply with 4.18.

213.3.3  Urinals.  Where more than one urinal is provided, at least one shall comply with 605.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1108.2 has a similar requirement for the number of urinals.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.2 has an equivalent requirement for the number of urinals.

 

Where urinals are provided, the current guidelines require at least one to be accessible.  The final revised guidelines require at least one urinal to be accessible, where more than one is provided.  If a toilet room has only one urinal, an accessible urinal is not required.

 

5.14     Visible Alarms in Alterations to Existing Facilities

 

Table 5.14 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for visible alarms in alterations to existing facilities.

 

Table 5.14 – Visible Alarms and Alterations to Existing Facilities (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.

Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(14)  If emergency warning systems are provided, then they shall include both audible alarms and visual alarms complying with 4.28. . . .

 

4.1.6  Accessible Buildings: Alterations.

(1) General.  Alterations to existing buildings and facilities shall comply with the following: . . .

 

(b)  If existing elements, spaces, or common areas are altered, then each such altered element, space, feature, or area shall comply with the applicable provisions of 4.1.1 to 4.1.3 Minimum Requirements (for New Construction). . . .

202.3  Alterations.  Where existing elements or spaces are altered, each altered element or space shall comply with the applicable requirements of Chapter 2.

 

215.1  General.  Where fire alarm systems provide audible alarm coverage, alarms shall comply with 215.

Exception:  In existing facilities, visible alarms shall not be required except where an existing fire alarm system is upgraded or replaced, or a new fire alarm system is installed.

 

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 907.9.1 has an equivalent exception for visible alarms in alterations to existing facilities.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 907.9.1 has an equivalent exception for visible alarms in alterations to existing facilities.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require that when existing elements and spaces of a facility are altered, the alterations must comply with new construction requirements.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception to the scoping requirement for visible alarms in alterations to existing facilities.  Visible alarms are required only when an existing fire alarm system is upgraded or replaced, or a new fire alarm system is installed. 

5.15     Signs

 

Table 5.15 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to scoping and technical requirements for signs.

 

Table 5.15 – Signs (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.2  Accessible Sites and Exterior Facilities: New Construction.  An accessible site shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(7)  Building Signage.  Signs which designate permanent rooms and spaces shall comply with 4.30.1, 4.30.4, 4.30.5, and 4.30.6.  Other signs which provide direction to, or information about, functional spaces of the building shall comply with 4.30.1, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, and 4.30.5. . . .

 

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(16)  Building Signage.

 

(a)  Signs which designate permanent rooms and spaces shall comply with 4.30.1, 4.30.4, 4.30.5, and 4.30.6.

 

(b)  Other signs which provide direction to or information about functional spaces of the building shall comply with 4.30.1, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, and 4.30.5.

Exception:  Building directories, menus, and all other signs which are temporary are not required to comply.

 

4.30.6  Mounting Location and Height.  Where permanent identification is provided for rooms and spaces, signs shall be installed on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. . . . Mounting height shall be 60 in (1525 mm) above the finish floor to the centerline of the sign. . . .

216.1  General.  Signs shall be provided in accordance with 216 and shall comply with 703.

Exceptions: 1.  Building directories, menus, seat and row designations in assembly areas, occupant names, building addresses, and company names and logos shall not be required to comply with 216.

2.  In parking facilities, signs shall not be required to comply with 216.2, 216.3, and 216.6 through 216.12.

3.  Temporary, 7 days or less, signs shall not be required to comply with 216. . . .

 

216.2  Designations.  Interior and exterior signs identifying permanent rooms and spaces shall comply with 703.1, 703.2, and 703.5.  . . .

Exception:  Exterior signs that are not located at the door to the space they serve shall not be required to comply with 703.2.

 

216.3  Directional and Informational Signs.  Signs that provide direction to or information about interior spaces and facilities of the site shall comply with 703.5.

 

703.4.1  Height Above Finish Floor or Ground.  Tactile characters on signs shall be located 48 inches (1220 mm) minimum above the finish floor or ground surface, measured from the baseline of the lowest tactile character and 60 inches (1525 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground surface, measured from the baseline of the highest tactile character. . . .

 

703.4.2  Location.  Where a tactile sign is provided at a door, the sign shall be located alongside the door at the latch side. . . .

Exception:  Signs with tactile characters shall be permitted on the push side of doors with closers and without hold-open devices.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section E1107.3 of Appendix E has similar requirements and exceptions for certain signs.

 

IBC 2003:  Sections E107.2 and E107.3 of Appendix E has similar requirements and exceptions for certain signs.

 

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Section 703.2.7 has an equivalent requirement for the height of tactile characters on signs.  Section 703.2.8 has an equivalent exception for the location of signs with tactile characters.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines have scoping and technical requirements for certain signs.  The current guidelines contain an exception that exempts building directories, menus, and temporary signs from the requirements.  The final revised guidelines expand this exception to include seat and row designations in assembly areas, occupant names, building addresses, and company names and logos.  The final revised guidelines also exempt signs in parking facilities, other than signs identifying accessible parking spaces and means of egress. The final revised guidelines clarify that the exception for temporary signs applies to signs used for 7 days or less.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts exterior signs identifying permanent rooms and spaces from providing tactile characters, where the exterior signs are not located at the door to the space they serve. 

 

The current guidelines require signs with tactile characters identifying permanent rooms to be located 60 inches above the finish floor along the latch side of the door, measured to the centerline of the sign.  The final revised guidelines provide greater flexibility, and require the signs be located between 48 inches above the finish floor, measured from the baseline of the lowest tactile character, and 60 inches above the finish floor, measured from the baseline of the highest tactile character.  The final revised guidelines also permit signs with tactile characters to be located on the push side of doors with closers that do not have hold-open devices.

5.16     Drive-Up Public Telephones

 

Table 5.16 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for wheelchair accessible public telephones.

 

Table 5.16 – Public Telephones (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

(17)  Public Telephones.

(a)  If public pay telephones, public closed circuit telephones, or other public telephones are provided, then they shall comply with 4.31.2 through 4.31.8 to the extent required by the following table: . . .

217.2  Wheelchair Accessible Telephones.  Where public telephones are provided, wheelchair accessible telephones complying with 704.2 shall be provided in accordance with Table 217.2.

Exception:  Drive-up only public telephones shall not be required to comply with 217.2.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  No exception for drive-up only public telephones.

 

IBC 2003:  No exception for drive-up only public telephones.

 

Where public telephones are provided, the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require a certain number of telephones to be wheelchair accessible.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts drive-up public telephones.

 

5.17     Assistive Listening Systems[82]

 

Table 5.17.1 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirements for assistive listening systems.

 

Table 5.17.1 – Assistive Listening Systems (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(19)  Assembly Areas. . . .

 

(b)  This paragraph applies to assembly areas where audible communications are integral to the use of the space (e.g., concert and lecture halls, playhouses and movie theaters, meeting rooms, etc.).  Such assembly areas, if (1) they accommodate at least 50 persons, or if they have audio-amplification systems, and (2) they have fixed seating, shall have a permanently installed

assistive listening system complying with 4.33.  For other assembly areas, a permanently installed assistive listening system, or an adequate number of electrical outlets or other supplementary wiring necessary to support a portable listening system shall be provided.  The minimum number of receivers to be provided shall be equal to 4 percent of the total number of seats, but in no case less than two.  . . .

 

11.2.1  Courtrooms.  . . .

 

(2) Permanently installed assistive listening systems complying with 4.33 shall be provided in each courtroom.  The minimum number of receivers shall be four percent of the room occupant load, as determined by applicable State or local codes, but not less than two receivers.  . . .

 

 

219.2  Required Systems.  In each assembly area where audible communication is integral to the use of the space, an assistive listening system shall be provided.

Exception:  Other than in courtrooms, assistive listening systems shall not be required where audio amplification is not provided.

 

219.3  Receivers.  Receivers complying with 706.2 shall be provided for assistive listening systems in each assembly area in accordance with Table 219.3.  Twenty-five percent minimum of receivers provided, but no fewer than two, shall be hearing-aid compatible in accordance with 706.3. 

Exceptions: 1.  Where a building contains more than one assembly area and the assembly areas required to provide assistive listening systems are under one management, the total number of required receivers shall be permitted to be calculated according to the total number of seats in the assembly areas in the building provided that all receivers are usable with all systems.

2.  Where all seats in an assembly area are served by an induction loop assistive listening system, the minimum number of receivers required by Table 219.3 to be hearing-aid compatible shall not be required to be provided.

 

Table 219.3 Receivers for Assistive Listening Systems

 

 

Capacity of Seating in Assembly Area

 

Minimum  Number of Required Receivers

Minimum Number of Required Receivers Required to be Hearing-Aid Compatible

50 or less

2

2

 

51 to 200

2, plus 1 per

 25 seats over 50 seats¹

 

2

 

201 to 500

2, plus 1 per

25 seats over

50 seats¹

 

1 per 4 receivers¹

 

501 to 1000

20, plus 1 per 33 seats over 500 seats¹

 

1 per 4 receivers¹

 

1001 to 2000

35, plus 1 per

50 seats over 1000 seats¹

 

1 per 4 receivers¹

 

2001 and over

55, plus 1 per

100 seats over

2000 seats¹

 

1 per 4 receivers¹

1. Or fraction thereof

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1107.2.4 has similar requirements for assistive listening systems and the number of receivers, but no exceptions.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1108.2.7 has equivalent requirements for assistive listening systems and the number of receivers, and an equivalent exception for buildings that contain more than one assembly area.

 

The current guidelines require assembly areas where audible communication is integral to the use of the space to provide an assistive listening system if they have an audio amplification system or an occupant load of 50 or more persons.  The final revised guidelines exempt assembly areas, other than court rooms, that do not have audio amplification systems from providing assistive listening systems. 

 

The current guidelines require receivers to be provided for at least 4 percent of the seats or room occupant load.  The final revised guidelines revise the percentage of receivers required.  As Table 5.17.2 shows, the number of receivers is significantly reduced for larger assembly areas.

 

Table 5.17.2 – Number of Receivers Required (text version)

Seating Capacity

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

5,000

200

85

10,000

400

135

25,000

1,000

285

50,000

2,000

535

 

The final revised guidelines add a new exception that allows multiple assembly areas that are in the same building and under the same management, such as theaters in a multiplex cinema and lecture halls in a college building, to calculate the number of receivers required based on the total number of seats in all the assembly areas, instead of each assembly area separately, where the receivers are compatible with the assistive listening systems used in each of the assembly areas.

 

The final revised guidelines also require at least 25 percent, but no fewer than two, of the receivers to be hearing-aid compatible.  Assembly areas served by an induction loop assistive listening system do not have to provide hearing-aid compatible receivers.

 

5.18     Wheelchair Spaces in Assembly Areas[83]

 

Table 5.18.1 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirements for wheelchair spaces in assembly areas.

 

Table 5.18.1 – Wheelchair Spaces in Assembly Areas (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings: New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . . 

 

(19)  Assembly Areas.

 

(a)  In places of assembly with fixed seating, accessible wheelchair locations shall comply with 4.33.2, 4.33.3, and 4.33.4 and shall be provided consistent with the following table:

 

Capacity of Seating

in Assembly Areas

Number of Required Wheelchair Locations

4 to 25

1

26 to 50

2

51 to 300

4

301 to 500

6

over 500 seats

6 plus one additional seat for each total seating capacity increase over 100

. . .

 

 

221.2  Wheelchair Spaces.  Wheelchair spaces complying with 221.2 shall be provided in assembly areas with fixed seating.

 

221.2.1.1  General Seating.  Wheelchair spaces complying with 802.1 shall be provided in accordance with Table 221.2.1.1.

 

Table 221.2.1.1 Number of Wheelchair Spaces

 in Assembly Areas

Number of Seats

Minimum Number of Required Wheelchair Spaces

4 to 25

1

26 to 50

2

51 to 150

4

151 to 300

5

301 to 500

6

501 to 5000

6, plus 1 for each 150,

 or fraction thereof,

between 501 through 5000

 

5001 and over

36, plus 1 for each 200,

or fraction thereof,

over 5000

 

221.2.1.2  Luxury Boxes, Club Boxes, and Suites in Arenas, Stadiums, and Grandstands.  In each luxury box, club box, and suite within arenas, stadiums, and grandstands, wheelchair spaces complying with 802.1 shall be provided in accordance with Table 221.2.1.1.

 

221.2.1.3  Other Boxes.  In boxes other than those required to comply with 221.2.1.2, the total number of wheelchair spaces required shall be determined in accordance with Table 221.2.1.1  Wheelchair spaces shall be located in not less than 20 percent of all boxes provided.  Wheelchair spaces shall comply with 802.1.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1107.2.2 has similar requirements for the number of wheelchair spaces in assembly areas.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1108.2.2 has similar requirements for the number of wheelchair spaces in assembly areas.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require assembly areas with fixed seating to provide wheelchair spaces based on seating capacity.  The final revised guidelines revise the number of wheelchair spaces required in assembly areas with more than 500 seats.  As Table 5.18.2 shows, the number of wheelchair spaces is significantly reduced for larger assembly areas.

 

Table 5.18.2 – Number of Wheelchair Spaces Required (text version)

Seating Capacity

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

5,000

51

36

10,000

101

61

25,000

251

136

50,000

501

261

 

The final revised guidelines clarify that the scoping requirements are to be applied separately to general seating areas, and to each luxury box, club box, and suite in stadiums and arenas.  In performing arts facilities with tiered boxes, the scoping requirement is applied to the total number of seats in the tiered boxes, and the wheelchair spaces are required to be dispersed among at least 20 percent of the tiered boxes.  For example, if a performing arts facility has 20 tiered boxes with 5 fixed seats in each box, at least 4 wheelchair spaces must be provided in the boxes, and they must be dispersed among at least 4 of the 20 boxes.

 

5.19     Patient Toilet Rooms[84]

 

Table 5.19 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for patient toilet rooms. 

 

Table 5.19 – Patient Toilet Rooms (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

6.4  Patient Toilet Rooms.  Where toilet/bathrooms are provided as a part of a patient bedroom, each patient bedroom that is required to be accessible shall have an accessible toilet/bathroom that complies with 4.22 or 4.23 and shall be on an accessible route.

223.1  General.  In licensed medical care facilities and licensed long-term care facilities where the period of stay exceeds twenty-four hours, patient or resident sleeping rooms shall be provided in accordance with 223.

Exception:  Toilet rooms that are part of critical or intensive care patient sleeping rooms shall not be required to comply with 603.

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  No exception for toilet rooms serving critical or intensive care patient sleeping rooms.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.2 has an equivalent exception for toilet rooms serving critical or intensive care patient sleeping rooms.

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require a percentage of patient sleeping rooms to provide mobility features, including accessible toilet rooms. The final revised guidelines add a new exception that exempts toilet rooms serving critical or intensive care patient sleeping rooms.

5.20     Self-Service Storage Facilities

 

Table 5.20 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping requirement for self-service storage facilities.

 

Table 5.20 – Self-Service Storage Facilities (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.1 Application.

 

(1)  General.  All areas of newly designed or newly constructed buildings and facilities and altered portions of existing buildings and facilities shall comply with section 4, unless otherwise provided in this section or as modified in a special application section.

 

 

 

225.3  Self-Service Storage Facilities.  Self-service storage facilities shall provide individual self-storage spaces complying with these requirements in accordance with Table 225.3.

 

Table 225.3  Self-Service Storage Facilities

Total Spaces in Facility

Minimum Number of Spaces

Required to be Accessible

1 to 200

5 percent, but no fewer than 1

 

201 and over

10, plus 2 percent of total number of units over 200

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1107.6 has an equivalent requirement for the number of accessible storage spaces.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1108.3 has an equivalent requirement for the number of accessible storage spaces.

 

The current guidelines require all areas of newly constructed facilities to be accessible.  The final revised guidelines add a new scoping requirement for self-storage facilities.  Facilities with 200 or fewer storage spaces are required to make at least 5 percent of the storage spaces accessible.  Facilities with more than 200 storage spaces are required to provide 10 accessible storage spaces, plus make at least 2 percent of the storage spaces over 200 accessible. 

5.21     Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers

 

Table 5.21 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping and technical requirements for washing machines and clothes dryers.

 

Table 5.21 Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.1 Application.

 

(1)  General.  All areas of newly designed or newly constructed buildings and facilities and altered portions of existing buildings and facilities shall comply with section 4, unless otherwise provided in this section or as modified in a special application section.

 

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings:  New Construction.  Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(13)  Controls and operating mechanisms in accessible spaces, along accessible routes, or as parts of accessible elements (for example, light switches and dispenser controls) shall comply with 4.27.

 

4.27.3  Height.  The highest operable part of controls, dispensers, receptacles and other operable equipment shall be placed within at least one of the reach ranges specified in 4.2.5 or 4.2.6.

 

4.2.6  Side Reach. . . .  If the side reach is over an obstruction, the reach and clearances shall be as shown in Fig. 6 (c).

 

[Note:  Figure 6 (c) shows an obstruction that is 34 inches maximum in height.  The high side reach is 46 inches maximum for a reach depth of 24 inches maximum.]

214.2  Washing Machines.   Where three or fewer washing machines are provided, at least one shall comply with 611.  Where more than three washing machines are provided, at least two shall comply with 611.

 

214.3 Clothes Dryers.   Where three or fewer clothes dryers are provided, at least one shall comply with 611.  Where more than three clothes dryers are provided, at least two shall comply with 611.

 

611.3 Operable Parts.  Operable parts, including doors, lint screens, and detergent and bleach compartments, shall comply with 309.

 

309.3 Operable Parts.  Operable parts shall be placed within one or more of the reach ranges specified in 308.

 

308.3.2  Obstructed High Reach.  Where a clear floor or ground space allows a parallel approach to an element and the high side reach is over an obstruction, the height of the obstruction shall be 34 inches (865 mm) maximum and the depth of the obstruction shall be 24 inches (610 mm) maximum.  . . . Where the reach depth exceeds 10 inches (225 mm), the high side reach shall be 46 inches (1170 mm) maximum for a reach depth of 24 inches (610 mm) maximum.

Exceptions:  1.  The top of washing machines and clothes dryers shall be permitted to be 36 inches (915 mm) maximum above the finish floor. . . .

     Model Codes & Standards   

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Section 308.3.2 has an equivalent requirement for an obstructed high reach, but no exception for washing machines and clothes dryers.

 

The current guidelines do not contain a specific scoping requirement for washing machines and clothes dryers.[85]  The final revised guidelines require at least one of each machine to be accessible, where three or fewer of each machine are provided; and at least two of each machine to be accessible, where more than three of each machine are provided.  The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines require the operable parts of accessible equipment to be placed within a forward or side reach; and specify a 34 inch maximum height for an obstruction for a high side reach.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for a high side reach over washing machines and clothes dryers that permit the tops of the machines to be 36 inches maximum above the finish floor to accommodate currently available machines.

 

5.22     Handrails[86]

 

Table 5.22 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the technical requirements for handrails.

 

Table 5.22 – Handrails (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines


 

4.8.5  Handrails.  If a ramp run has a rise greater than 6 in (150 mm) or a horizontal projection greater than 72 in (150 mm), than it shall have handrails on both sides. . . . Handrails shall comply with 4.26 and shall have the following features: . . .

 

(2)  If handrails are not continuous, they shall extend at least 12 in (305 mm) beyond the top and bottom of the ramp segment and shall be parallel with the floor or ground surface (see Fig. 17).

 

(3)  The clear space between the handrail and the wall shall be 1½ in (38 mm).

 

(4)  Gripping surfaces shall be continuous.

 

4.9.4  Handrails.  Stairways shall have handrails at both sides of all stairs.  Handrails shall comply with 4.26 and shall have the following features: . . .

 

(2)  If handrails are not continuous, they shall extend at least 12 in (305 mm) beyond the top riser and at least 12 in (305 mm) plus the width of one thread beyond the bottom riser.

 

(3)  The clear space between handrails and wall shall be 1½ in (38 mm).

 

(4)  Gripping surfaces shall be uninterrupted by newel posts, other construction elements, or obstructions.

 

4.26.2  Size and Spacing of Grab Bars and Handrails.  The diameter or width of gripping surfaces of a handrail or grab bar shall be 1¼ in to 1½ in (32 mm to 38 mm), or the shape shall provide an equivalent gripping surface.  If handrails or grab bars are mounted adjacent to a wall, the space between the wall and grab bar shall be 1½ in (38 mm) (see Fig. 39(a), (b), (c), and (e)).

 

4.26.4  Eliminating Hazards.  A handrail or grab bar and any wall or other surface adjacent to it shall be free of any sharp or abrasive elements.  Edges shall have a minimum radius of ⅛ in (3.2 mm).

 

505.5  Clearance.  Clearance between handrail gripping surfaces and adjacent surfaces shall be 1½ inches (38 mm) minimum.

 

505.6  Gripping Surface.  Handrail gripping surfaces shall be continuous along their length and shall not be obstructed along their tops or sides.   The bottoms of handrail gripping surfaces shall not be obstructed more than 20 percent of their length.  Where provided, horizontal projections shall occur 1½ inches (38 mm) minimum below the bottom of the handrail gripping surface.

Exceptions: . . .

2.  The distance between the horizontal projections and the bottom of the gripping surface shall be permitted to be reduced by ⅛ inch (3mm) for each ½ inch (13 mm) of additional handrail perimeter dimension that exceeds 4 inches (100 mm).

 

505.7  Cross Section.  Handrail gripping surfaces shall have a cross section complying with 505.7.1 or 505.7.2.

 

505.7.1  Circular Cross Section.  Handrail gripping surfaces with a circular cross section shall have an outside diameter of 1¼ inches (32 mm) minimum and 2 inches (51 mm) maximum.

 

505.7.2  Non-Circular Cross Section.  Handrail gripping surfaces with a non-circular cross section shall have a perimeter dimension of 4 inches (100 mm) minimum and 6¼ inches (160 mm) maximum, and a cross section dimension of 2¼ inches (57 mm) maximum.

 

505.8  Surfaces.  Handrail gripping surfaces and any surfaces adjacent to them shall be free from sharp or abrasive elements and shall have rounded edges.

 

505.10  Handrail Extensions.  Handrail gripping surfaces shall extend beyond and in the same direction of stair flights and ramp runs in accordance with 505.10.

Exceptions: . . .

3.  In alterations, full extensions of handrails shall not be required where such extensions would be hazardous due to plan configuration.

 

505.10.3  Bottom Extension at Stairs.  At the bottom of a stair flight, handrails shall extend at the slope of the stair flight for a horizontal distance at least equal to one tread depth beyond the last riser nosing. . . .

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1003.3.3.11 has similar requirements for handrails.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1009.11 has similar requirements for handrails.

 

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Section 505 has similar requirements for handrails.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines contain technical requirements for handrails.  The final revised guidelines provide more flexibility than the current guidelines as follows:

 

§    The current guidelines require the clearance between handrail gripping surfaces and adjacent surfaces to be exactly 1½ inches.  The final revised guidelines require the clearance to be 1½ inches minimum.

 

§    The current guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces to have edges with a minimum radius of ⅛ inch.  The final revised guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces to have rounded edges.

 

§    The current guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces to have a diameter of 1¼ inches to 1½ inches, or to provide an equivalent gripping surface.  The final revised guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces with a circular cross section to have an outside diameter of 1¼ inches to 2 inches.  Handrail gripping surfaces with a non-circular cross section must have a perimeter dimension of 4 inches to 6¼ inches, and a cross section dimension of 2¼ inches maximum.

 

§    The current guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces to be continuous, and to be uninterrupted by newel posts, other construction elements, or obstructions.  The final revised guidelines require handrail gripping surfaces to be continuous along their length and not to be obstructed along their tops or sides.  The bottoms of handrail gripping surfaces must not be obstructed more than 20 percent of their length.  Where provided, horizontal projections must occur at least 1½ inches below the bottom of the handrail gripping surface.  An exception permits the distance between the horizontal projections and the bottom of the gripping surface to be reduced by ⅛ inch for each ½ inch of additional handrail perimeter dimension that exceeds 4 inches.

 

§    The current guidelines require handrails at the bottom of stairs to extend at least 12 inches plus the width of one tread beyond the bottom riser.  The final revised guidelines require handrails at the bottom of stairs to extend a horizontal distance at least equal to one tread depth beyond the last riser nosing.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for alterations to existing facilities that exempts handrails at the top and bottom of ramps and stairs from providing full extensions where it would be hazardous due to plan configuration.

 

5.23     Toilet Room Doors[87]

 

Table 5.23 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the technical requirement for toilet room doors.

 

Table 5.23 – Toilet Room Doors (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.22.2  Doors.  All doors to accessible toilet rooms shall comply with 4.13.  Doors shall not swing into the clear floor space required for any fixture.

603.1  General.  Toilet and bathing rooms shall comply with 603.

 

603.2.3  Door Swing.  Doors shall not swing into the clear floor space or clearance required for any fixture.  Doors shall be permitted to swing into the required turning space.

Exceptions: . . .

2.  Where the toilet room or bathing room is for individual use and a clear floor space complying with 305.3 is provided within the room beyond the arc of the door swing, doors shall be permitted to swing into the clear floor space or clearance required for any fixture.

Model Codes & Standards

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Section 603.2.3 has an equivalent requirement for toilet room doors and an equivalent exception for single-user toilet rooms.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines prohibit doors from swinging into the clear floor space or clearance required for any fixture in toilet rooms.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for single-user toilet rooms that permits the door to swing into the clear floor space or clearance required for any fixture, where a clear floor space is provided within the room beyond the arc of the door swing.  This exception results in at least a 7 square feet reduction in the required size of an accessible single-user toilet room.

 

5.24     Water Closet Location and Rear Wall Grab Bar[88]

 

Table 5.24 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the technical requirements for the water closet location and rear grab bar. 

 

Table 5.24 – Water Closet Location and Rear Wall Grab Bar (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.17.3  Size and Arrangement.  The size and arrangement of the standard toilet stall shall comply with Fig. 30(a), Standard Stall. . . .

 

[Note:  Figure 30 (a) shows the centerline of the water closet as 18 inches (455 mm) absolute from the side wall.]

 

4.17.6  Grab Bars.  Grab bars complying with the length and positioning shown in Fig. 30 (a), (b), (c), and (d) shall be provided. . . .

 

[Note:  Figures 30 (a), (b), (c), and (d) show the length of the rear grab bar as 36 inches (915 mm) minimum.]

604.2  Location.  The water closet shall be positioned with a wall or partition to the rear and to one side.  The centerline of the water closet shall be 16 inches (405 mm) minimum to 18 inches (455 mm) maximum from the side wall or partition. . . .

 

604.5.2  Rear Wall.  The rear wall grab bar shall be 36 inches (915 mm) long minimum and extend from the centerline of the water closet 12 inches (305 mm) minimum on one side and 24 inches (610 mm) on the other side.

Exceptions: 1.  The rear grab bar shall be permitted to be 24 inches (610 mm) long minimum, centered on the water closet, where wall space does not permit a length of 36 inches (915 mm) minimum due to the location of a recessed fixture adjacent to the water closet. . . .

Model Codes & Standards

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Sections 604.2 has an equivalent requirement for the water closet location.  Section 604.5.2 has a similar requirement for the rear wall grab bar.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines contain technical requirements for the location of water closets and the rear wall grab bar.  The current guidelines require the centerline of the water closet in accessible toilet rooms and compartments to be located exactly 18 inches from the side wall, and the rear wall grab bar to be at least 36 inches long.  The final revised guidelines require the centerline of the water closet to be located between 16 inches and 18 inches from the side wall.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that permits the rear wall grab bar to be at least 24 inches long, where there is not enough wall space for a 36 inch long grab bar because a lavatory is located adjacent to the water closet and the wall behind the lavatory is recessed so that the lavatory does not overlap the clear floor space at the water closet.

 

5.25     Shower Compartments[89]

 

Table 5.25 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the technical requirements for shower compartments.

 

Table 5.25 – Shower Compartments (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.21.2  Size and Clearances.  Except as specified in 9.1.2, shower stall size and clear floor space shall comply with Fig. 35 (a) or (b).  The shower stall in Fig. 35 (a) shall be 36 in by 36 in (915 mm by 915 mm).  Shower stall required by 9.1.2 shall comply with Fig. 57 (a) or (b).  The shower stall in Fig. 35 (b) will fit into the space required for a bathtub.

 

[Note:  Figure 35 (b) shows a roll-in shower compartment that is 30 inches wide and 60 inches long minimum and that has no seat.]

 

9.1.2  Accessible Units, Sleeping Rooms, and Suites. 

. . . In addition, in hotels of 50 or more sleeping rooms or suites, additional accessible sleeping rooms or suites that include a roll-in shower shall also be provided in conformance with the table below.  Such accommodations shall comply with the requirements of 9.2, 4.21, and Figure 57 (a) or (b). . . .

 

[Note:  Figure 57 (b) shows an alternate roll-in shower compartment that is 36 inches wide and 60 inches long minimum and that has a seat.  There is a 36 inch minimum opening on the long side of the compartment.  The controls are located on the end wall adjacent to the seat.]

 

4.21.5  Controls.  Faucets and other controls complying with 4.27.4 shall be located as shown in Fig. 37. . . .

 

[Note:  Figure 37 shows the control area located between 38 inches minimum and 48 inches maximum above the shower floor.]

 

4.21.7  Curbs.  If provided, curbs in shower stalls 36 in by 36 in (915 mm by 915 mm) shall be no higher than ½ in (13 mm).  Shower stalls that are 30 in by 60 in (760 mm by 1525 mm) minimum shall not have curbs.

 

 

608.1  General.  Shower compartments shall comply with 608.

 

608.2.1  Transfer Type Shower Compartments.  Transfer type shower compartments shall be 36 inches (915 mm) by 36 inches (915 mm) clear inside dimensions measured at the center points of opposing sides and shall have a 36 inch (915 mm) wide minimum entry on the face of the shower compartment. . . .

 

608.2.3 Alternate Roll-In Type Shower Compartments.  Alternate roll-in type shower compartments shall be 36 inches (915 mm) wide and 60 inches (1220 mm) deep minimum clear inside dimensions measured at center points of opposing sides.  A 36 inch (915 mm) wide minimum entry shall be provided at one end of the long side of the compartment.

 

608.4  Seats.  A folding or non-folding seat shall be provided in transfer type shower compartments.  A folding seat shall be provided in roll-in showers required in transient lodging guest rooms required to provide mobility features complying with 806.2. . . .

 

608.5.3  Alternate Roll-In Type Shower Compartments.  In alternate roll-in type shower compartments, the controls, faucets, and shower spray unit shall be located above the grab bar, but no higher than 48 inches (1220 mm) above the shower floor.  Where a seat is provided, the controls, faucets, and shower spray unit shall be located on the side wall adjacent to the seat 27 inches (685 mm) maximum from the side wall behind the seat or shall be located on the back wall opposite the seat 15 inches (380 mm) maximum, left or right, of the centerline of the seat.  Where a seat is not provided, the controls, faucets, and shower spray unit shall be installed on the side wall farthest from the compartment entry.

 

608.7  Thresholds.  Thresholds in roll-in type shower compartments shall be ½ inch (13 mm) high maximum in accordance with 303.  In transfer type shower compartments, thresholds ½ inch (13 mm) high maximum shall be beveled, rounded, or vertical.

Exception:  A threshold 2 inches (51 mm) high maximum shall be permitted in transfer type shower compartments in existing facilities where provision of a ½ inch (13 mm) high threshold would disturb the structural reinforcement of the floor slab.

Model Codes & Standards

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Sections 608.2 through 608.7 have similar requirements for shower compartments.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines contain technical requirements for transfer-type and roll-in shower compartments.  The final revised guidelines provide more flexibility than the current guidelines as follows:

 

§    Transfer-type showers are 36 inches by 36 inches and have a folding or non-folding seat.  The final revised guidelines specify that these dimensions are measured at the center point of opposing sides to accommodate molded compartments with rounded bottom edges. 

 

§    The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines permit a ½ inch maximum curb in transfer-type showers.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception that permits a 2 inch maximum curb in transfer-type showers in alterations to existing facilities, where recessing the compartment to achieve a ½ inch curb would disturb the structural reinforcement of the floor slab.

 

§    Roll-in showers are 30 inches minimum by 60 inches minimum.  Alternate roll-in showers are 36 inches by 60 inches minimum, and have a 36 inch minimum opening on the long side of the compartment.  The current guidelines permit alternate roll-in showers to be used only in hotel guest rooms; require a seat to be provided on the side with the opening; and require the controls to be located on the side adjacent to the seat.  The final revised guidelines permit alternate roll-in showers to be used in any facility; only require a seat in hotel guest rooms; and provide more locations for the controls. 

 

§    The current guidelines prohibit curbs in roll-in showers.  The final revised guidelines permit a ½ inch maximum curb. 

5.26     Sales and Service Counters

 

Table 5.26 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the technical requirements for sales and service counters.

 

Table 5.26 – Sales and Service Counters (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

7.2 Sales and Service Counters . . .

 

(1)  In areas used for transactions where counters have cash registers and are provided for sales or distribution of goods or services to the public, at least one of each type shall have a portion of the counter which is at least 36 in (915 mm) in length with a maximum height of 36 in (915 mm) above the finish floor. . . .

 

(2)  In areas used for transactions that may not have a cash register but at which goods or services are sold or distributed . . . either:

 

(i)  a portion of the main counter which is a minimum of 36 in (915 mm) in length shall be provided with a maximum height of 36 in (915 mm); or

 

(ii)  an auxiliary counter with  maximum height of 36 in (915 mm) in close proximity to the main counter be provided; or

 

(iii)  equivalent facilitation shall be provided . . .

904.4 Sales and Service Counters.  Sales and service counters shall comply with 904.4.1 or 904.4.2.  The accessible portion of the counter top shall extend the same depth as the sales or service counter top.

Exception:  In alterations, when the provision of a counter complying with 904.4 would result in a reduction of the number of existing counters at work stations or a reduction of the number of existing mailboxes, the counter shall be permitted to have a portion which is 24 inches (610 mm) long minimum complying with 904.4.1 provided that the required clear floor or ground space is centered on the accessible length of the counter.

 

904.4.1  Parallel Approach.  A portion of the counter surface that is 36 inches (915 mm) long minimum and 36 inches (915 mm) high maximum above the finish floor shall be provided.  A clear floor or ground space complying with 305 shall be positioned for a parallel approach adjacent to the 36 inch (915 mm) minimum length of the counter.

Exception:  Where the provided counter surface is less than 36 inches (915 mm) long, the entire counter surface shall be 36 inches (915 mm) high maximum above the finish floor.

 

904.4.2  Forward Approach.  A portion of the counter surface that is 30 inches (760 mm) long minimum and 36 inches (915 mm) high maximum shall be provided. Knee and toe space complying with 306 shall be provided under the counter.  A clear floor or ground space complying with 305 shall be positioned for a forward approach to the counter.

Model Codes & Standards

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Section 904.3 has similar requirements for sales and service counters.

 

The current guidelines and the final revised guidelines contain technical requirements for sales and service counters.  The current guidelines generally require counters to have an accessible portion at least 36 inches long and no higher than 36 inches.  The current guidelines provide some flexibility for counters that do not have cash registers.  The final revised guidelines specify different lengths for the accessible portion of counters based on the type of approach.  Where a forward approach is provided, the accessible portion of the counter must be at least 30 inches long and no higher than 36 inches, and knee and toe space must be provided under the counter.  Where a parallel approach is provided, the accessible portion of the counter must be at least 36 inches long and no higher than 36 inches.  The final revised guidelines add a new exception for alterations to counters in existing facilities that permits the accessible portion of the counter to be at least 24 inches long, where providing a longer accessible counter would result in a reduction in the number of existing counters or existing mailboxes.

 

The final revised guidelines clarify that the accessible portion of the counter must extend the same depth as the sales or service counter top.  Where the counter is a single-height counter, this requirement applies across the entire depth of the counter top.  Where the counter is a split-height counter, this requirement applies only to the customer side of the counter top.  The employee-side of the counter top may be higher or lower than the customer-side of the counter top.

5.27     Detectable Warnings

 

Table 5.27 shows the relevant text of the current guidelines and the final revised guidelines with respect to the scoping and technical requirements for detectable warnings.

 

Table 5.27 – Detectable Warnings (text version)

Current Guidelines

Final Revised Guidelines

4.1.3  Accessible Buildings:  New Construction.

Accessible buildings and facilities shall meet the following minimum requirements: . . .

 

(15)  Detectable warnings shall be provided at locations specified in 4.29.

 

4.7.7  Detectable Warnings.  A curb ramp shall have a detectable warning complying with 4.29.2.  The detectable warning shall extend the full width and depth of the curb ramp.

 

4.29.1  General.  Detectable warnings required by 4.1 and 4.7 shall comply with 4.29.

 

4.29.2  Detectable Warnings on Walking Surfaces.  Detectable warnings shall consist of  raised truncated domes with a diameter of  nominal 0.9 in (23 mm), a height of nominal 0.2 in (5 mm) and a center-to-center spacing of nominal 2.35 in (60 mm) and shall contrast visually with adjoining surfaces, either light-on-dark, or dark-on-light.  The material used to provide contrast shall be an integral part of the walking surface.  Detectable warnings used on interior surfaces shall differ from adjoining walking surfaces in resiliency or sound-on-cane contact.

 

4.29.5  Detectable Warnings at Hazardous Vehicular Areas.  If a walk crosses or adjoins a vehicular way, and the walking surfaces are not separated by curbs, railings, or other elements between the pedestrian areas and vehicular areas, the boundary between the areas shall be defined by a continuous detectable warning which is 36 in (915 mm) wide, complying with 4.29.2.

 

4.29.6  Detectable Warnings at Reflecting Pools.  The edges of reflecting pools shall be protected by railings, walls, curbs, or detectable warnings complying with 4.29.2.

 

10.3.1  New Construction.  New stations in rapid rail, light rail, commuter rail, intercity bus, intercity rail, high speed rail, and other fixed guideway systems (e.g., automated guideway transit, monorails, etc.) shall comply with the following provisions as applicable: . . .

 

(8)  Platform edges bordering on a drop-off and not protected by platform screens or guard rails shall have a detectable warning.  Such detectable warnings shall comply with 4.29.2 and shall be 24 inches wide running the full length of the platform drop-off.

218.2 New and Altered Fixed Guideway Stations.  New and altered stations in rapid rail, light rail, commuter rail, intercity rail, high speed rail, and other fixed guideway systems shall comply with 810.5 through 810.10.

 

218.3  Key Stations and Existing Intercity Rail Stations.  Key stations and existing intercity rail stations shall comply with 810.5 through 810.10.

 

810.5  Rail Platforms.  Rail platforms shall comply with 810.5.

 

810.5.2  Detectable Warnings.  Platform boarding edges not protected by platform screens or guards shall have detectable warnings complying with 705 along the full length of the public use area of the platform.

 

705.1  General.  Detectable warnings shall consist of a surface of truncated domes and shall comply with 705.

 

705.1.1  Dome Size.  Truncated domes in a detectable warning surface shall have a base diameter of 0.9 inch (23 mm) minimum and 1.4 inches (36 mm) maximum, a top diameter of 50 percent of the base diameter minimum to 65 percent of the base diameter maximum, and a height of 0.2 inch (5.1 mm).

 

705.1.2  Dome Spacing.  Truncated domes in a detectable warning surface shall have a center-to-center spacing of 1.6 inches (41 mm) minimum and 2.4 inches (61 mm) maximum, and a base-to-base spacing of 0.65 inch (17 mm) minimum, measured between the most adjacent domes on a square grid.

 

705.1.3  Contrast.  Detectable warning surfaces shall contrast visually with adjacent walking surfaces either light-on-dark, or dark-on-light.

 

705.2  Platform Edges.  Detectable warning surfaces at platform boarding edges shall be 24 inches (610 mm) wide and shall extend the full length of the public use areas of the platform.

 

 

Model Codes & Standards

IBC 2000:  Section 1108.9 has an equivalent requirement for detectable warnings at transit platform edges.

 

IBC 2003:  Section 1109.9 has an equivalent requirement for detectable warnings at transit platform edges.

 

ICC/ANSI A117.1-1998:  Sections 705.1 through 705.3 have similar requirements for detectable warnings characteristics.

 

Detectable warnings are a distinctively textured surface of truncated domes that is identifiable by cane and underfoot.  The current guidelines require detectable warnings at curb ramps, hazardous vehicular areas, reflecting pools, and transit platform edges.[90]  The final revised guidelines only require detectable warnings at transit platform edges.[91]  The final revised guidelines change the specifications for the diameter and spacing of the truncated domes to permit a range of dimensions.  The final revised guidelines also delete the requirements for the material used to provide contrast to be an integral part of the truncated domes, and for the truncated domes to contrast in resiliency or sound-on-cane contact from adjoining walking surfaces at interior locations.