Budget and Performance

Access Board Federal Employee Survey Results (2013)

Attachments:
Download this file (employee-survey.pdf)employee-survey.pdf

Survey Background

Each year the U.S. Access Board joins with other federal agencies in participating in the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, as required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-136, November 24, 2003, 117 STAT. 1641).  Congress established a requirement for agencies to conduct an annual survey of their employees to assess employee satisfaction as well as leadership and management practices that contribute to agency performance.

Survey Process

The 2013 Federal Employee Viewpoint (FEV) Survey focuses on employee perceptions that drive employee satisfaction, commitment, and engagement, which ultimately contribute to the mission of agencies.  The 2013 FEV Survey was administered by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) from April 23rd to June 7, 2013.  This year at the Board, 20 out of 27 surveys were completed.

Positives

Below are the top five findings of the 2013 FEVS.  These findings seem to indicate that Access Board staff take pride in their work and feel that the work of the agency is important.  It should also be noted that Access Board employees understand and are dedicated to the mission and priorities of the Board.  Below are the U.S. Access Board’s top five findings compared to the results of other small agencies:

 USABAll Small Agencies
I know how my work relates to the agency’s goals and priorities. 96% 84%
When needed I am willing to put in the extra effort to get a job done. 96% 97%
I am held accountable for achieving results. 95% 83%
The work I do is important. 90% 87%
My agency is successful at accomplishing its mission. 90% 78%

Challenges

Access Board employees express little satisfaction with their training opportunities, the agency’s performance management, and communication. The management at the Access Board plans to maintain a high-performing, effective, and family-friendly workplace while working on ways to improve its performance culture for all employees.  Below are the U.S. Access Board’s top five findings compared to other small agencies:

 USABAll Small Agencies
In my work unit, steps are taken to deal with a poor performer who cannot or will not improve. 6% 37%
How satisfied are you with your opportunity to get a better job in your organization? 10% 31%
How satisfied are you with the training you receive for your present job? 10% 49%
My training needs are assessed. 11% 44%
Pay raises depend on how well employees perform their jobs. 11% 26%

The management at the Access Board plans to maintain a high-performing, effective, and family-friendly workplace while working on ways to improve its performance culture for all employees.

Response Summary
 20132012
Government wide 48.2% 46.1%
U.S. Access Board 74.1% 79.3%

Below are the results of the Access Board’s 2013 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey question by question.  This document also compares these results with those of other Small Federal agencies.


2013 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey:  My Index
 USABAll Small Agencies
My Index — Percent Positive 58% 63%
1. I am given a real opportunity to improve my skills in my organization. 40% 63%
2. I have enough information to do my job well. 61% 71%
3. I feel encouraged to come up with new and better ways of doing things. 44% 59%
4. My work gives me a feeling of personal accomplishment. 65% 73%
5. I like the kind of work I do. 83% 83%
6. I know what is expected of me on the job. 80% 77%
7. When needed I am willing to put in the extra effort to get a job done. 96% 97%
8. I am constantly looking for ways to do my job better. 84% 89%
9. I have sufficient resources (for example, people, materials, budget) to get my job done. 67% 49%
10. My workload is reasonable. 66% 60%
11. My talents are used well in the workplace. 37% 58%
12. I know how my work relates to the agency’s goals and priorities. 96% 84%
13. The work I do is important. 90% 87%
14. Physical conditions (for example, noise level, temperature, lighting, cleanliness in the workplace) allow employees to perform their jobs well. 86% 74%
15. My performance appraisal is a fair reflection of my performance. 77% 72%
16. I am held accountable for achieving results. 95% 83%
17. I can disclose a suspected violation of any law, rule or regulation without fear of reprisal. 62% 60%
18. My training needs are assessed. 11% 44%
19. In my most recent performance appraisal, I understood what I had to do to be rated at different performance levels (for example, Fully Successful, Outstanding). 53% 65%
20. The people I work with cooperate to get the job done. 76% 77%
21. My work unit is able to recruit people with the right skills. 26% 56%
22. Promotions in my work unit are based on merit. 24% 42%
23. In my work unit, steps are taken to deal with a poor performer who cannot or will not improve. 6% 37%
24. In my work unit, differences in performance are recognized in a meaningful way. 13% 37%
25. Awards in my work unit depend on how well employees perform their jobs. 24% 44%
26. Employees in my work unit share job knowledge with each other. 75% 75%
27. The skill level in my work unit has improved in the past year. 36% 57%
28. How would you rate the overall quality of work done by your work unit? 86% 87%
29. The workforce has the job-relevant knowledge and skills necessary to accomplish organizational goals. 67% 75%
30. Employees have a feeling of personal empowerment with respect to work processes. 43% 46%
31. Employees are recognized for providing high quality products and services. 33% 51%
32. Creativity and innovation are rewarded. 28% 41%
33. Pay raises depend on how well employees perform their jobs. 11% 26%
34. Policies and programs promote diversity in the workplace (for example, recruiting minorities and women, training in awareness of diversity issues, mentoring). 56% 56%
35. Employees are protected from health and safety hazards on the job. 77% 78%
36. My organization has prepared employees for potential security threats. 71% 68%
37. Arbitrary action, personal favoritism and coercion for partisan political purposes are not tolerated. 62% 52%
38. Prohibited Personnel Practices (for example, illegally discriminating for or against any employee/applicant, obstructing a person’s right to compete for employment, knowingly violating veterans’ preference requirements) are not tolerated. 79% 67%
39. My agency is successful at accomplishing its mission. 90% 78%
40. I recommend my organization as a good place to work. 59% 64%
41. I believe the results of this survey will be used to make my agency a better place to work. 31% 45%
42. My supervisor supports my need to balance work and other life issues. 81% 82%
43. My supervisor/team leader provides me with opportunities to demonstrate my leadership skills. 72% 69%
44. Discussions with my supervisor/team leader about my performance are worthwhile. 67% 64%
45. My supervisor/team leader is committed to a workforce representative of all segments of society. 57% 69%
46. My supervisor/team leader provides me with constructive suggestions to improve my job performance. 46% 64%
47. Supervisors/team leaders in my work unit support employee development. 37% 68%
48. My supervisor/team leader listens to what I have to say. 76% 78%
49. My supervisor/team leader treats me with respect. 76% 82%
50. In the last six months, my supervisor/team leader has talked with me about my performance. 41% 81%
51. I have trust and confidence in my supervisor. 67% 69%
52. Overall, how good a job do you feel is being done by your immediate supervisor/team leader? 66% 72%
53. In my organization, leaders generate high levels of motivation and commitment in the workforce. 35% 43%
54. My organization’s leaders maintain high standards of honesty and integrity. 46% 56%
55. Managers/supervisors/team leaders work well with employees of different backgrounds. 63% 64%
56. Managers communicate the goals and priorities of the organization. 62% 61%
57. Managers review and evaluate the organization’s progress toward meeting its goals and objectives. 78% 61%
58. Managers promote communication among different work units (for example, about projects, goals, needed resources). 27% 50%
59. Managers support collaboration across work units to accomplish work objectives. 40% 55%
60. Overall, how good a job do you feel is being done by the manager directly above your immediate supervisor/team leader? 59% 60%
61. I have a high level of respect for my organization’s senior leaders. 52% 54%
62. Senior leaders demonstrate support for Work/Life programs. 87% 62%
63. How satisfied are you with your involvement in decisions that affect your work? 54% 54%
64. How satisfied are you with the information you receive from management on what’s going on in your organization? 56% 49%
65. How satisfied are you with the recognition you receive for doing a good job? 57% 51%
66. How satisfied are you with the policies and practices of your senior leaders? 52% 44%
67. How satisfied are you with your opportunity to get a better job in your organization? 10% 31%
68. How satisfied are you with the training you receive for your present job? 10% 49%
69. Considering everything, how satisfied are you with your job? 65% 67%
70. Considering everything, how satisfied are you with your pay? 61% 52%
71. Considering everything, how satisfied are you with your organization? 56% 60%
79. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Telework 78% 77%
80. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Alternative Work Schedules (AWS) 79% 91%
81. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Health and Wellness Programs (for example, exercise, medical screening, quit smoking programs) 100% 82%
82. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 100% 75%
83. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Child Care Programs (for example, daycare, parenting classes, parenting support groups) --- 62%
84. How satisfied are you with the following Work/Life programs in your agency?  Elder Care Programs (for example, support groups, speakers) --- 64%

Subcategories

  • Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

    Introduction

    Welcome to the Access Board’s FOIA page. We hope to provide you helpful information about the Access Board and about the Freedom of Information Act. Below is a description of that Act, as well as a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs).

    FOIA Officer

    Lisa Fairhall, Deputy General Counsel
    U.S. Access Board
    1331 F Street NW, Suite 1000
    Washington, DC 20004
    202-272-0046 (voice)
    202-272-0081 (fax)
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    The Freedom of Information Act

    The Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. § 552), provides a right of access to the public of government records. The Act also allows the government to withhold certain information in responding to those requests in nine exemptions, including for national security, deliberative process and attorney client, and confidential business information, to name a few.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. What does FOIA do?

    As noted above, FOIA provides a right of access to the public of government records. The Act also allows the government to withhold certain information in responding to those requests in nine exemptions, including for national security, deliberative process and attorney client, and confidential business information, to name a few.

    2. Can I ask a question under FOIA?

    Yes, but please be aware that FOIA does not require agencies to do research, analyze data, answer written questions, or to create records in order to respond to a request.

    Staff at the Access Board are availble to provide technical assistance on a variety of issues. Please reference our e-mail directory for the types of questions we answer quickly and routinely. If it suits your need, please consider using that contact information instead of submitting a FOIA request.

    It is important to understand that there is no central office in the government which processes FOIA requests for all agencies; each Federal agency responds to FOIA requests for records in its own files. Thus, the public may submit FOIA requests to the Access Board to obtain records that are in the Access Board’s files.

    3. How do I submit a FOIA request?

    Individuals wishing to file a FOIA request must write a letter to submit a FOIA request. Address your letter to:

    FOIA Officer,
    U.S. Access Board
    1331 F Street NW, Suite 1000
    Washington, DC 20004

    You may also fax your letter to: 202-272-0081, or send your request by e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

    4. Do I need to submit a particular form to request documents under FOIA?

    No. However, in order to process your request, you need to reasonably describe the records you are looking for, providing as much information as possible (in order for the Access Board to search for them). The Access Board may also contact you to request that you provide more detail.

    5. Is there a fee to submit a FOIA request?

    The Access Board, like other agencies, may charge a fee for responding to your FOIA request. The amount of thefee depends on who you are and why you are making a FOIA request. The FOIA Act divides requesters into four categories for fees, as described below. In addition, in certain circumstances, the Access Board may request advance payment of fees. You may also indicate, in your letter, how much in fees you are willing to pay, before the Access Board needs to contact you.

    Commercial use requesters:
    When the Access Board receives a request for documents for commercial use, it will assess charges that recover the full direct cost of searching for, reviewing for release, and duplicating the records sought.
    Educational and non-commercial scientific institution requests:
    The Access Board shall provide documents to requesters in this category for the cost of reproduction alone, excluding charges for the first 100 pages.
    Representatives of the news media:
    The Access Board shall provide documents to requesters in this category for the cost of reproduction alone, excluding charges for the first 100 pages.
    All other requesters:
    The Access Board shall charge requesters who do not fit into any of the categories above fees that recover the full reasonable direct cost of searching for and reproducing records that are responsive to the request, except that the first 100 pages of reproduction and the first two hours of search time shall be furnished without charge.

    The Access Board may waive fees, in whole or in part, if “disclosure of the information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government and is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.” If you wish to request a waiver of fees, please provide as much information as possible about how you will be using the information in order for the Access Board to make its determination.

    Please note that in certain circumstances, such as when fees exceed $250, the Access Board may contact a requester for the advance payment of fees by check or money order payable to the U.S. Treasury.

    6. How long will it take to receive an answer to my FOIA request?

    The FOIA Act gives the Access Board a minimum of 20 working days (that’s excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal public holidays) to respond to your request. The Access Board can also extend that time period an additional 10 working days (the Access Board will send you a notification when that occurs). The 20-day time period only begins when the Access Board has received your request.

    7. What if I have concerns about the processing of my FOIA request or about the response I receive to my FOIA request?

    If you have questions or concerns about the status or processing of your request, you may call the FOIA officer, at 202-272-0046. The FOIA Officer is available to assist you in answering questions that you have about your request.

  • Performance and Accountability Report
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