APS Products and Manufacturer Information

Figure 3 presents a product matrix that lists various types of APS products and their associated Walk indication and other features, as of March 2003.

Matrix of Accessible
Pedestrian Signal Functions
TYPE                      
Pedhead mounted O   X X     O     X X
Pushbutton integrated X O   O X X X        
Vibrotactile   X                  
Receiver based               X X    
WALK INDICATIONS                      
Tones X O X X X X X     X X
Speech messages X     O O X X X X    
Vibrating surface X X   O X X O 0      
Message to receiver               X X    
Audible beaconing O     X   X O        
OTHER FEATURES                      
Pushbutton locator tone X X   O X X X        
Tactile arrow X X   0 X X X        
Pushbutton information message 0     0   0 0        
Automatic volume adjustment X     X X X X     X  
Alert tone 0       X            
Actualtion indicator X     O O X X        
Tactile Map             X        
Braille & raised print information O         O          
Extended button press O     O O X          
Passive sensor circuit X                    
Clearance interval tones O     O   O          

Notes: X = Standard feature; O = Optional feature.


Campbell Company

Type of APS

Pushbutton-integrated iQ APS
Pedhead mounted speaker available

Campbell iQ57 APS device with speakers in front and on sides of pushbutton device. Campbell H frame APS showing raised arrow, a feature of both styles.  Speaker is located under pushbutton.
Figure 1(left): Campbell iQ57 APS device with speakers in front and on sides of pushbutton device. Figure 2 (right): Campbell H frame APS showing raised arrow, a feature of both styles. Speaker is located under pushbutton.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Speech message
  • Cuckoo
  • Chirp
  • Vibrating arrow
  • Fixed Walk message times or Walk message can be on during the full Walk interval

Other

  • Pushbutton Locator tone (locator signal)
  • Tactile arrow
  • Automatic volume adjustment
  • Separate volume control for locator tone and Walk signal
  • Actuation indicator –flashing LED and tone or speech message(acknowledgement message)

Optional features

Walk indication

  • Other tones as requested
  • Additional pedhead-mounted speaker to provide beaconing (directed messages)
  • Audible beaconing through alternating signal or far-side-only signal

Other

  • Pushbutton information message (instructional message)
  • Extended button press
  • Braille street name
  • Passive pedestrian detection
  • Remote pedestrian actuation (remote activation)
  • Clearance interval message
  • Alert tone (Walk onset tone)
  • eater for the vibrating arrow

Installation notes

A driver unit that provides the logic mounts in the pedestrian signal head and is wired to Walk /Don’t Walk signal. Eight conductor 24 awg 7/30 stranded wire is run from the pedhead to the pushbutton location. The control unit , see figure 3, (called a driver module) is designed to fit and be placed in a clam shell-type pedhead. Campbell control unit installed in a 16 inch pedhead.
Figure 3: Campbell control unit installed in a 16 inch pedhead.

An external control unit, to be mounted outside smaller over/under pedheads is available. The WALK and DON’T WALK wiring is connected to the driver module, along with the output connects to the pushbutton and associated speaker units, and microphone accessories. There is no direct wiring application between the controller and the push button unit (it uses 14 awg pair that serves the pushbutton; however, four pair (minimum) or six pair (desirable) of 18-22 awg wires must be run from the push button unit to the corresponding pedestrian head. These wire pairs are connected to the “vibrator”, “speaker”, “pushbutton” and “LED” connections on the control panel. Microphone for automatic volume adjustment is mounted in pedhead. Volume controls must be adjusted by the installer and are located on the controller board.

Pushbutton designed to install on pole with tactile arrow parallel to crosswalk. Care must be taken with placement on the pole to align the arrow correctly.

A wiring diagram for the Campbell device is shown in Figure 4

Driver Module
Wiring Diagram for a Campbell APS Device.

Figure 4: Wiring Diagram for a Campbell APS Device.

Comments

  • Available in H frame or standard configuration
  • A variety of pushbutton mountings and signs available.

Manufacturer

Campbell Company, Boise,Idaho

http://www.pedsafety.com


Georgetown pushbutton seen from bottom, showing vibrating arrow location.

Georgetown Electric

Type of APS

Vibrotactile-only - VIPB98

Pushbutton-integrated - VIPB99

Figure 5: Georgetown pushbutton seen from bottom, showing vibrating arrow location.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • VIPB98 - Vibrating mechanism on underside of casing
  • VIPB99 — Vibrating mechanism on underside of casing and audible beeping Walk indication, 2 per second

Other

  • VIPB98 - Tactile arrow on vibrating mechanism
  • VIPB99 — Clicking locator tone at 1/sec (locator audible)
  • Tactile arrow

Optional features

  • Choice of curved or flat back for mounting

Installation notes

VIPB99 requires another circuit connection to the WALK/Don’t Walk (locator tone activated by the Don’t Walk and vibrator activated by the Walk) and a 25.2 AC, 450 mA step down transformer to bring the voltage from the 110/120 VAC source down to 24 VAC.

Power is brought from Walk /green lead to the pushbutton.

Transformer is not supplied with the APS.

Comments

No automatic volume adjustment. This device does not respond to ambient sound and does not comply with current MUTCD recommendations or with the Access Board’s Draft Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines.

Pushbutton also does not meet the minimum size recommendation, of at least two inches, in the draft Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines.

Without a locator tone, pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired may have difficulty locating and using the pushbutton.

Manufacturer

Georgetown Electric, Ltd., Wilmington, DE


Three Mallory devices seen from different angles.

Mallory Sonalert

Type of APS

Pedhead-mounted VSB 110-1 and VSB 110-4

Figure 6: Three Mallory devices seen from different angles.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Cuckoo - 800 Hz and 1200 Hz, every 1.5 secs
  • Chirp — 2000 Hz, every 1 sec

Optional features

  • N/A

Installation notes

The device broadcasts cuckoo/chirp from the pedhead and is usually mounted inside the pedhead. Typically, a single wire is connected to the WALK indication terminal in the pedhead and a second wire is connected to the neutral terminal. When current is sent from the controller to illuminate the visual WALK indication, the APS device is activated for the duration of the walk phase.

Two Mallory devices installed on a pole in Nashville, TN.Davidson County, Tennessee developed a method of installing the device on the pole (Figure 7 at right). A ped-head bracket is used and secured to the pole with band clamps about 7 to 8 feet off the ground. A 6" piece of pipe is screwed into the end of the bracket, and the audible device sits behind the piece of pipe. For wiring, a hole is drilled into the pole, and an electrical connection is made to the walk signal wires. The wires are attached to the audible device,and tape is used to cover the wire connection to the audible device.

Figure 7: Two Mallory devices installed on a pole in Nashville, TN.

Comments

No automatic volume adjustment. This device does not respond to ambient sound and does not comply with current MUTCD recommendations or with the Access Board’s Draft Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines.

Without a locator tone, pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired may have difficulty locating and using the pushbutton.

Mallory also sells sound generators in various beeps, siren and chime sounds; these are not recommended sounds for use as AP

Manufacturer

Mallory Sonalert Products, Inc., Indianapolis, IN

http://www.mallory-sonalert.com


Novax Industries

Type of APS

Pedhead-mounted DS 100 APS and DS 2000 APS

Additional components available for DS 2000 with functions of pushbutton and vibrating arrow integrated.

Novax DS 2000 speakers mounted on top of pedheads
Figure 8 (left): Novax DS 2000 speakers mounted on top of pedheads.
Novax VibraWalk pushbutton option to provide locator tone and vibrating arrow
Figure 9 (right): Novax VibraWalk pushbutton option to provide locator tone and vibrating arrow.

Standard features

Walk indication

DS 100

  • Two or Four tones standard
  • Cuckoo — alternating high and low frequency - 1 sec repetition rate with 0.2 sec duration, 1100 Hz
  • Chirp (peep-peep)- varying frequency tone - 1 sec repetition rate with 0.2 sec duration, 2800 Hz

DS 2000

  • Two or four tones standard
  • Cuckoo, Peep, short beep, and long beep,r custom voice or message
  • Maximum Walk Timer for ‘Rest-in-Walk’ locations
  • Audible Beaconing using concurrent or alternating sounds

Other

DS 100 and DS 2000

  • Automatic volume adjustment (dynamic volume compensation)
  • External sound adjustment screw

Optional features

WALK indication

DS 100

  • Speech messages up to 15 seconds long
DS 2000
  • Two additional custom tones
  • Speech messages up to 16 seconds long
  • Vibrating Raised arrow

Other

DS 2000

  • Pushbutton Locator tone - speaker for mounting at pushbutton height or higher - 800 Hz shaped square wave or 50 ms “click” repeated once per second
  • Actuation indicator (LED)
  • Extended button press (Button Actuated Timer, BAT)
  • Clearance interval message
  • Pushbutton information message (Pedestrian Acknowledge)
  • Separate volume settings for locator tone and Walk signal
  • Sound inhibit — disables signal at sensitive periods, during complex traffic phases or as required
  • Internal sound adjustment available for security

Installation notes

Wiring needs will vary depending on setup. Typically, a 3 wire 18 gauge -120 VAC derived from Walk and Don’t Walk indicator is used. Some have concern over the 120 VAC and have modified the system.

Range of response to ambient sound is set by installer.

The speaker box is typically mounted to the signal pole or on top of the pedhead and wired to the WALK and DON’T WALK circuits, along with the common/ground terminal. The device broadcasts the WALK indication from the pedhead speaker. The black wire (provided) is connected to the WALK indication terminal in the pedhead and a white wire (provided) is connected to a neutral terminal in the pedhead. When current is sent from the controller to illuminate the visual WALK indication, the APS device is activated for the duration of the walk phase.

An innovative method of installing the speaker inside the pedhead has been developed by the City of Portland and McCain Traffic

The locator tone and vibrating arrow are an optional additional component of the device. A series of wires run from the pedhead unit to the push button to power the pushbutton speaker, and vibrating arrow. A current problem with Novax is the 120 VAC power that is sent to the pushbutton from the pedhead unit for the vibrating arrow feature. Some traffic engineers are concerned that this is excessive voltage and can be a safety problem if the pushbutton is removed or destroyed. Novax has been working on resolving the issues and developing other options with more typical voltage. This may have been resolved by the time this document is published.

Comments

Internal board and speaker unit available that mounts in the pedhead.

Manufacturer

Novax Industries, Inc., New Westminister, BC, Canada

www.novax.com


Bob Panich Consultancy

Type of APS

Pushbutton-integrated BPC APS

Panich device with large tactile arrow and large pushbutton. Pushbutton mounted on a pole in Australia.
Figure 10 (left): Panich device with large tactile arrow and large pushbutton. Figure 11 (middle): Pushbutton mounted on a pole in Australia.
Driver unit that is to be mounted on the pole near the pedhead, shown with housing closed and open.  
Figure 12 (right): Driver unit that is to be mounted on the pole near the pedhead, shown with housing closed and open.  

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Tone — 500 Hz with a repetition rate of 8.5Hz - series of rapid thump sounds
  • Vibrating arrow
  • Fixed Walk message length of 8, 16 or 32 seconds or Walk message can be on during the full Walk interval

Other

  • Pushbutton Locator tone (locating tone) — 880 Hz with a repetition rate of 1 Hz for US market, or 1000Hz with a repetition rate of .55Hz for Australian market
  • Tactile arrow
  • Automatic volume adjustment
  • Alert tone (transitional tone) — brief burst of 3500 tone,decreasing exponentially to 700Hz, and then going to 500 Hz Walk tone
  • Three standard settings for sensitivity of automatic gain control (volume adjustment)

Optional features

Walk indication

  • Cuckoo and chirp or other sounds
  • Speech message as Walk indication

Other

  • Actuation indicator (demand indicator/demand tone) - light and tone
  • Extended button press — allows pedestrians to request a Walk tone at 12 dB above the sound of the locator tone (Higher volume demand, HVD)

Installation notes

The pushbutton assembly is connected to the pushbutton wire pair to the controller. The APS control unit, called driver module in the manufacturer’s information, is mounted in a housing on the pole near the pedhead and wired to the pedhead. A second wire pair is run to the driver module on the pole. The module is wired to the WALK indication and is activated with the voltage to the pedhead. Manufacturers specifications should be consulted for other wiring requirements that are specific to each setup.

Automatic gain control, the level of the tone in response to ambient noise, is set during installation.

Pushbutton designed to install on pole with tactile arrow parallel to crosswalk. Care must be taken with placement on the pole to align the arrow correctly.

Comments

Complies with specifications of the Australian standard; standard pushbutton in Australia.

Manufacturer states that they will provide other features as needed.

Manufacturer

Bob Panich Consultancy Pty. Ltd., Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
http://www.bobpanich.com.au


Polara Engineering

Type of APS

Pushbutton-integrated Navigator APS

Polara Navigator unit installed on a stub pole in Silver Spring, MD. Polara unit photo showing vibrotactile arrow on pushbutton.
  Figure 13: Polara Navigator unit installed on a stub pole in Silver Spring, MD. Figure 14: Polara unit photo showing vibrotactile arrow on pushbutton.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Speech message — recorded by manufacturer or customer
  • Cuckoo — 1250 Hz and 1000 Hz .6 sec duration, 1.8 sec interval
  • Chirp — 2700 to 1700 Hz .2 sec duration, 1.8 sec interval
  • Vibrating arrow
  • Fixed Walk message times or Walk message can be on during full Walk interval

Other

  • Pushbutton Locator tone
  • Tactile arrow
  • Automatic volume adjustment - 60 dB range
  • Actuation indicator—tone and light
  • Extended button press which can be used to activate a pushbutton message, actuate APS or request a louder Walk signal and locator tone for subsequent clearance interval

Optional features

Walk indication

  • Walk tones or speech messages as requested

Other

  • Push button information message (voice on location)
  • Braille street name on the face plate
  • Face plate with informational sign

Installation notes

Four pairs of 18-22 awg wires must run from the control unit to the Navigator pushbutton unit. Pedhead mounted control units or control cabinet control units are available.

One control unit for each device (push button unit). The control unit is installed in a typical 16-inch person/hand clam shell type pedestrian head and is powered from the WALK and DON’T WALK 120 VAC in the pedhead and converts voltage to 24 VDC (max.) to control the push button functions. There is no direct wiring application between the controller and the push button unit (it uses 14 awg pair that serves the pushbutton; however, four pair (minimum) or six pair (desirable) of 18-22 awg wires must be run from the push button unit to the corresponding pedestrian head. These wire pairs are connected to the "vibrator", "speaker", "pushbutton" and "LED" connections on the control panel. A Polara control unit and associated wire connections, is shown in Figure 4. Three 12 to 18 awg wires are also run from the control unit to the pedestrian head power terminals for the WALK, DON’T WALK, and "common" connections. This wire is the 115 VAC connections provided by the signal controller’s load switch. One wire is also required to connect the microphone located on the bottom of the pedestrian head to the control unit.

For new/reconstructed intersections where new wire will be pulled, the control unit can be placed in the controller cabinet. The control unit consists of a shelf mount card rack power supply base station that can hold up to four control units. One control unit is required for each walk phase. A single microphone can be used to control the audible sounds for all control units, or each control unit can have its own microphone. Four pair of 18-22 awg wire are required to each push button unit.

The installer sets separate volume controls for Walk message and locator tone volumes. In addition, microphone sensitivity can be adjusted.

Pushbutton designed to install on pole with tactile arrow parallel to crosswalk. Care must be taken with placement on the pole to align the arrow correctly.

Polara Control Unit Wiring Diagram

Figure 15: Polara Control Unit Wiring Diagram.

Comments

Manufacturer is developing a model that operates with only two wires to the pushbutton and is programmable after installation by a traffic engineer using a handheld PDA type device. The new model will have the capability to alternate signal sounds, to countdown pedestrian clearance interval and present a signal at the far end of the crosswalk only. It is expected to be available by fall 2003.

Manufacturer

Polara Engineering, Fullerton, CA

http://www.polara.com


Prisma Teknik

Type of APS

Pushbutton-integrated: Several models with different standard features, TS-907, TS-903F, TS-904, TS-908

Additional pedhead mounted directional speaker, TS-995, available

Diagram showing different components inside the pushbutton unit. Prisma APS mounted on a pole in Denmark.
Figure 16: Diagram showing different components inside the pushbutton unit. Figure 17: Prisma APS mounted on a pole in Denmark.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Ten different tones possible - same tone as locator tone at rapid rate of 10 repetitions per second

Other

  • Pushbutton Locator tone, 10 different tones available
  • Tactile arrow
  • Automatic volume adjustment within range of 55- 95 dB
  • Actuation indicator - light and tone
  • Crosswalk tactile map (Braille map)
  • Fault indicator

Optional features

Walk indication

  • Vibrating button or arrow on bottom or top of device
  • Speech Walk message
  • Additional directional speaker for mounting at overhead location

Other

  • Pushbutton Information Message 1-16 seconds
  • Night switch

Crosswalk tactile map

Chart showing the selection of standard symbols supplied with the Prisma APS; Photo of Prisma installed on the street with pedestrian using tactile map.

The crosswalk tactile map is a standard features of the Prismatek device. Symbols are standardized in Sweden.

Figure 18 and 19: Chart showing the selection of standard symbols supplied with the Prisma APS.

Figure 20: Photo of Prisma installed on the street with pedestrian using tactile map.

Installation notes

Diagram of prisma volume and sound setting screws, found inside the top of the pushbutton device.Volume min/max levels are adjustable by installer. Diagram at right shows the ettings, inside the top of the device, adjustable with a screwdriver after emoving the cover.

Figure 21: Diagram of prisma volume and sound setting screws, found inside the top of the pushbutton device.

Tactile arrow is mounted horizontally on top of device, allowing some latitude in placement of a pole, while still making it possible to align the arrow parallel with the associated crosswalk.

Control Board of the Prisma unit.Figure 22 at left: Control Board of the Prisma unit.

Push button units are connected directly to the terminal wire connection in a typical mast arm. A seven 18 to 22 awg wire cable is provided with the unit. Wires are connected to the typical push button terminal, red indication terminal, green indication terminal, neutral, and ground. Also, connections are made to power the sound. Voltage to the pushbutton has been 120 VAC which is greater than some of the other devices. A new US model is being released in April 2003 which provides DC power to the pushbutton, with step-down transformers mounted in the pedhead.

Figure 23: A wiring diagram for the Prisma unit as of 2002. A wiring diagram for the Prisma unit as of 2002.
A wiring diagram for the Prisma unit as of 2002 with labels noted below.
  1. Black - DIP switch option activation (see DIP switch)
  2. Brown - 1 second Push button signal out to controller.
    Controller responds 120/230 VAC to light up LED’s
  3. White - 120/230 VAC supply to push button signal.
    Can be connected to Red (4.) if controller allows (neccessary on red only)
  4. Red - 230 VAC Red / DON’T WALK phase
  5. Blue - 0 VAC Neutral
  6. Grey - 230 VAC Green / WALK phase
  7. Green/Yellow - Ground

Comments

New device is being released in April in the US that allows adjustment of the device using PDA device.

Manufacturer

Prisma Teknik, Tibro, Sweden

http://www.prismateknik.com


Relume

Type of APS

Receiver-based

Relumeled pedhead displaying the WALK indication.
Handheld receiver for the Relume device; provides a speech or tactile message to pedestrian when it is pointed at the pedhead.
Figure 24 (left): Handheld receiver for the Relume device; provides a speech or tactile message to pedestrian when it is pointed at the pedhead.
Figure 25 (RIGHT): Relumeled pedhead displaying the WALK indication.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Directional speech message or vibrotactile indication at the receiver; message type is chosen by user.
  • Speech - Prerecorded speech message says “Proceed with caution’ during the Walk interval if receiver is standing within the width of the crosswalk lines extended, and aiming the receiver toward the opposite corner.
  • Vibrotactile — continuous low frequency vibration during Walk

Other

  • Wait message during Don’t Walk phases—says “Wait” and there is a pulsing tone during the flashing Don’t Walk
  • Vibrotactile — Don’t Walk is continuous high frequency vibration; flashing Don’t Walk is interrupted vibration.

Optional features

N/A

Installation notes

Pedestrian signal heads must be Relume LED heads. Speech message recorded in personal receiver is triggered by pulsed light from the Relume LED pedestrian signal display. The pedhead must be carefully positioned to transmit information only within the width of the crosswalk.

Relume devices are simply replacements LED pedheads with typical wiring. However, concerns have been raised about how to provide access to the information to pedestrians who are blind who do not have receivers and do not know where the Relume devices are located.

Comments

Speech message during Walk is not in language specified in MUTCD.

Device has an approximately 15 degree field to pick up signal.

Pedestrians who are blind must have access to receivers.

Pedestrians must know where the Relume pedheads are installed, or they are unlikely to search for or use the available information.

Without a locator tone, pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired may have difficulty locating and using the pushbutton.

Manufacturer

Relume Corporation, Troy, MI

http://www.relume.com


Talking Signs

Type of APS

Receiver-based

Talking signs transmitter mounted on top of pedhead. Closeup of Talking Signs® receiver in left hand.
Figure 26 (left): Talking signs receiver held in a hand; the receiver is approximately 6 inches long with a button on top which the pedestrians push to activate when scanning for messages Figure 27 (right): Talking signs transmitter mounted on top of pedhead.

Standard features

Walk Indication

  • Highly directional speech message transmitted by remote infrared light, to handheld receiver—repeats “Walk sign” and the name of the street to be crossed

Other

  • Wait message during Flashing Don’t Walk or Don’t Walk —repeats “Wait” and the name of the street to be crossed.
  • Orientation message with wider transmitter range, available to pedestrians before they reach the intersection, provides street identification, signalization and/or directional information.

Optional features

Additional landmark information can be included in the orientation message, as this information is received before users reach the intersection, and it does not interfere wit their ability to hear or attend to traffic and signal information when they are at the crosswalk.

Developments in the technology and installation may include radio transmitted speech or vibratory information to alert travelers to locations where transmitters are installed. This technology, developed under the direction of the Japan National Police Agency, is compatible with the Smith-Kettlewell/Talking Signs® standard.

How Talking Signs works

A bird’s eye view of Talking Signs® infrared transmitter system for intersections.

Figure 28: A bird’s eye view of Talking Signs® infrared transmitter system for intersections.

The above illustration shows how the Talking Signs infrared transmitter delivers messages to the pedestrian who is carrying a receiver.

Wide beam tells:

  • Direction of travel • “traveling east”
  • Present location • “on zero hundred block of Larkin”
  • Intersecting street • “towards Grove Street”

Narrow beam tells:

  • Crossing condition and intersecting street •
  • “Wait • Grove Street” or “Walk sign • Grove Street”
  • Safe crosswalk zone

Installation notes

The transmitter providing signal information must be carefully positioned to provide information only within the width of the crosswalk. Talking Signs has a control board mounted in the unit on the pedhead. The transmitters are wired by connecting one 110 VAC wire to the WALK, DON’T WALK, and common terminal in the pedhead. The current provided to operate the visual pedhead powers the Talking Signs transmitter. The pedestrian who is blind must have a receiver, point the receiver at the talking signs transmitter, and push the button to hear the message, ‘Walk sign is on’, or ‘Wait’, depending on the status of the walk indication.

Comments

Infinitely variable messages recorded in transmitters.

Receivers usable for many wayfinding tasks where transmitters are installed.

Pedestrians must know where the TS transmitters are installed, or they are unlikely to search for or use the available information.

Pedestrians who are blind must have access to receivers.

Infrared beams can be difficult to detect in some weather conditions.

Manufacturer

Talking Signs Inc., Baton Rouge, LA

http://www.talkingsigns.com


Photo of the US Traffic device mounted on top of a pedestrian signal head.

U.S. Traffic Corporation

Type of APS

Pedhead-mounted APS 10 -

Figure 29: Photo of the US Traffic device mounted on top of a pedestrian signal head.

Standard features

Walk Indication - tones

  • Cuckoo - 0.6 seconds duration,Frequency Base 1,100 Hz ± 20%, Frequency Deviation +120 Hz ± 20%
  • chirp (peep-peep) - 0.2 seconds duration, Frequency Base 2,800 Hz ± 20%

Other

  • Volume adjustment - self-switching to one of two output levels depending on ambient noise conditions

Optional features

Not available

Installation notes

This devices broadcasts cuckoo/chirp from a speaker mounted on the pedhead and is wired into the pedhead in the appropriate direction. A small hole is drilled into the top of the pedhead or in the signal pole, and the device is connected. A black wire (provided) is connected to the WALK indication terminal in the pedhead and a white wire (provided) is connected to a neutral terminal in the pedhead. When current is sent from the controller to illuminate the WALK indication, the APS device is activated during the duration of the walk phase. This device has a PC board that plugs into the unit and is housed inside the APS unit to adjust the sound using two settings, initial volume with no traffic (volume) and volume level increase with traffic (feedback). Figure 30 shows the APS-10 control board.

Typical PC Board and Control Unit of U.S. Traffic APS Device

Figure 30. Typical PC Board and Control Unit of U.S. Traffic APS Device

Comments

Manufacturer is developing a device that provides audible countdown information.

Without a locator tone, pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired may have difficulty locating and using the pushbutton.

Manufacturer

U.S. Traffic Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, CA

http://www.ustraffic.net


Wilcox SalesPhoto of pedhead with Wilcox APS mounted on top.

Type of APS

Pedhead-mounted - PS/A 10

Figure 31: Photo of pedhead with Wilcox APS mounted on top.

Standard features

Walk indication

  • Tones — cuckoo and chirp

Other

Not Available

Optional features

Not Available

Installation notes

Device broadcasts cuckoo/chirp from a speaker mounted on the pedhead and is wired into the pedhead in the appropriate direction. A small hole is drilled into the top of the pedhead or in the signal pole, and the device is connected. A black wire (provided) is connected to the WALK indication terminal in the pedhead and a white wire (provided) is connected to a neutral terminal in the pedhead. When current is sent from the controller to illuminate the WALK indication, the APS device is activated during the duration of the walk phase.

Mixed volume is adjusted by installer.

Comments

No automatic volume adjustment. This device does not respond to ambient sound and does not comply with current MUTCD recommendations or with the Access Board’s Draft Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines.

Without a locator tone, pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired may have difficulty locating and using the pushbutton.

Wilcox is also developing an audible sign using same speaker technology.

Manufacturer

Wilcox Sales Company, Claremont, CA
http://www.wilcoxsales.com


APS MANUFACTURER CONTACT INFORMATION

These manufacturers offer Accessible Pedestrian Signal products.

Campbell Company
221 West 37th Street, Suite C
Boise, Idaho 83714
Phone: (877) 345-1727, (208) 345-7459
Fax: (208) 345-7481
Web: www.pedsafety.com

Georgetown Electric, Ltd.
2507 West Second Street
Wilmington, DE 19805
Phone: (302) 652-4835
Fax: (302) 652-6447

Mallory Sonalert Products, Inc.
4411 South High School Road
Indianapolis, IN 46214
Phone: (317) 612-1000
Fax: (317) 612-10
Web: www.mallory-sonalert.com

Novax Industries, Inc
658 Derwent Way
New Westminster, BC
V3M5P8 Canada
Phone: (604) 525-5644
Fax: (604) 525-2739
Web: www.novax.com

Bob Panich Consultancy Pty. Ltd.
48 Church Street
P.O. Box 360
Ryde, NSW 2112, Australia
Phone: 61 2 9809 6499
Fax: 61 2 9809 6962
Web: www.bobpanich.com.au

Polara Engineering
4115 Artesia Avenue
Fullerton , CA 92833-2520
Phone: (888) 340-4872
Phone: (714) 521-0900
Fax: (714) 522-8001
Web: www.polara.com

Prisma Teknik AB
P.O. Box 5, S-543 21
Tibro, Sweden
Phone: (46) 504 150 40
Fax: (46) 504 141 41
Web: www.prismateknik.com

Prisma Teknik US distributor:
Eagle Traffic Control Systems
8004 Cameron Road
Austin, TX 78754
Phone: (512) 837-8310
Fax: (512) 837-0196
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.eagletcs.com

Relume Corporation
64 Park Street
Troy, MI 48083
Phone: 888-7RELUME, (248) 585-2640
Fax: (248) 585-1909
Web: www.relume.com

Talking Signs Inc.
812 North Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
Phone: (888) 825-5746
Fax: (504) 344-2811
Web: www.talkingsigns.com

U.S. Traffic Corporation
9603 John Street
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Phone: (562) 923-9600, (800) 733-7872
Fax: (562) 923-7555
Web: www.ustraffic.net

Wilcox Sales Company
1738 Finecroft Drive
Claremont, CA 91711-2411
Phone: (909) 624-6674
Fax: (909) 624-8207
Web: www.wilcoxsales.com