NVRC/CEPIN presentation by Lise Hamlin, Sept. 19, 2007

Lise Hamlin

NVRC/CEPIN

Emergency Alerts

One size does NOT fit all

Accessibility and Redundancy are Key

The best alerts are linked to a central system

Stand alone (plug-in) alerts are virtually useless

Crew must be trained in the use of the alerts

[Symbol for sign language interpretation.]

[Symbol for assistive listening system.]
[Symbol for open captioning.]

Emergency Alerts

US Department of Agriculture has established a system to reach thousands of employees in multiple campuses

http://www.usda.gov/oo/beprepared/communication.htm

 

 

Emergency Alerts

USDA Communication Tools – Automatically Provided to all Employees

Visual Fire Alarms

PA system with strobe lights and linked to pager system

Computer Emergency Notification System

 

Emergency Alerts

USDA Communication Tools – Systems Requiring Action from Employees

“Channel 6” Television Station

Employee Information Phone Line

Emergency Information Website

Voicemail

Email Messenger

Roam Secure, a Text-based System, sending alerts to employees who subscribe

Visual Alarms

A hardwired photoelectric single station smoke detector designed to give reliable early warning of smoke where both audible and visual alarms are required

A 90 decibel solid state piezo signal and a strobe with "FIRE" prominently displayed (Gentex 710CS http://www.silentcall.com/)

[Picture showing smoke detector with visual alarm.]

Visual Alerts

These provide a passive system: passengers don’t need to request them, remember to wear them, turn them on, or worry about them in the pool or shower

Visual alerts get the attention of everyone, night or day

Many deaf people wake from sleep with visual alerts

Visual alerts are valuable in public places as well as staterooms, restrooms

[Picture showing smoke detector with visual alarm.]

Visual Alerts

Other considerations:

Passengers must self identify to benefit - unless visual alerts are installed in every stateroom

May not be effective for all people: a recent study shows that late deafened adults may not wake with a visual alert

Press release, HLAA, 08/02/07: http://www.hearingloss.org/advocacy/pressrelease080207.asp

[Picture showing smoke detector with visual alarm.]

Visual paging monitors

Visual paging monitors provide text that can be input by crew during an emergency, similar to visual paging systems set up in some airports and hotels

[Picture showing man looking at nine TV screens/monitors.]

Visual paging monitors

 

Another passive alerting system: there is no need for the passenger to self-identify to benefit

Usable for all passengers day or night: can provide detailed emergency information

May be placed in common areas throughout the ship

May provide text in English other languages

May be able to provide pictures to alert children and people who use languages other than English

[Picture showing man looking at nine TV screens/monitors.]

 

Visual paging monitors

Other considerations

Does not alert passengers in their rooms

Does require a designated crew member to input the messages

[Picture showing man looking at nine TV screens/monitors.]

Pagers

Pagers or other personal telecommunication devices receive simple text communications in the form of e-mail and SMS.

Pagers would be distributed to passengers on request

[Picture of text pager.]

Pagers

These portable devices can be used anywhere it can receive the signal

Two-way pagers allow the passenger to alert crew regarding an emergency situation, as well as for the crew to push out an emergency message

Pagers that vibrate may be used as an alert during the night if placed under a pillow

[Picture of text pager.]

 

Pagers

Considerations

Passengers must self-identify to receive one

Pagers must be easy to operate

Passengers who have their own PDA or SideKicks may be resistant to carrying yet another device

Passengers may lose or forget to wear them

Pagers are not helpful in the shower or the pool

Units need to be regularly charged/maintained by crew

[Picture of text pager.]

Portable tactile signaler

Provides a passenger with a vibrating and visual portable alert

[Picture of portable tactile signaler.]

Portable tactile signaler

Portable systems can be used for people with a variety of hearing losses, including people who are deaf/blind

Tactile alerts will wake up people who may not wake up with visual alerts

Used in the room, up to 80 feet from the transmitter

[Picture of portable tactile signaler.]

Portable tactile signaler

Considerations

Passengers must self-identify

Passenger will only receive the alert within the range of the transmitter

Pagers are not useful in the shower or pool

Units need to be charged up/maintained by crew

[Picture of portable tactile signaler.]

Text Messaging

Uses an alert network to contact passengers during a major crisis or emergency. Can deliver important emergency alerts, notifications and updates to several devices at once:

e-mail account

cell phone

text pager

BlackBerry

wireless PDA

[Picture of BlackBerry.]

Sign Language
Messaging

Some PDA could be used for sign language, video streamed messages

Passengers sign on to the device they use most

No need for additional equipment

No need for distribution, education, or maintenance by crew

[Picture of BlackBerry.]

Phones as Emergency
Devices

Accessible phones allow passengers to receive emergency alerts from crew, or send alerts to the crew

[Picture of phone.]
[Picture of text telephone.]
[Picture of women on phone.]

Phones as emergency
devices

TTY’s for people who are deaf, and amplified, hearing aid compatible or CapTel phones for people who are hard of hearing or late-deafened should be provided where voice phones are available to others

[Picture of phone.]
[Picture of text telephone.]
[Picture of women on phone.]

 

Text Messaging

Considerations

Passengers must self identify, unless part of a package available to all passengers

Passengers may lose or forget to wear them

Device can’t be used in the pool or the shower

Passengers must keep the batteries charged, equipment maintained

[Picture of BlackBerry.]

Door Knock Sensors

Visual doorbells that alert passengers when crew need to enter staterooms in an emergency

[Picture of door knock sensor and visual display.]

Door Knock Sensors

Considerations

Portable units are sometimes over sensitive causing false alerts

Passengers may remove the devices

[Picture of door knock sensor and visual display.]

 

Emerging Technology

New studies on low frequency/multiple frequency smoke alarms

Some communities are experimenting with sending sign language emergency messages to PDA

 

Emergency Alerts

One size does NOT fit all

Accessibility and Redundancy are key

Alerts must be linked to a central system

Stand alone (plug-in) alerts are virtually useless

Crew must be trained in the use of the alerts

[Picture of showing two hands.]

[Picture of sign for hearing loss.]
[Picture with letters O C.]