Notes

1 The four mandatory symbols are the: symbols to identify elevator control buttons (Figure 407.4.7.13); International Symbol of Accessibility (Figure 703.7.2.1); International Symbol of TTY (Figure 703.7.2.2); and International Symbol of Access for Hearing Loss (Figure 703.7.2.4).

2 The Architectural Barriers Act requires the following agencies to adopt accessibility standards: Department of Defense and United States Postal Service for their facilities; Department of Housing and Urban Development for residential facilities; and General Services Administration for all other facilities.

3 The Architectural Barriers Act also covers facilities leased by federal agencies; facilities financed by a federal grant or loan; and facilities constructed by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The final rule does not apply to these facilities.

4 The Department of Defense and United States Postal Service are required to adopt accessibility standards for their facilities; the Department of Housing and Urban Development is required to adopt accessibility standards for residential facilities; and the General Services Administration is required to adopt accessibility standards for all other facilities covered by the Architectural Barriers Act.

5 The Department of Defense cross references Appendices C and D as the accessibility standards for its facilities in a Memorandum on Access for People with Disabilities (October 31, 2008) at: http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-aba-standards/background/dod-memorandum. The United ted States Postal Service cross references Appendices C and D as the accessibility standards for its facilities at 39 CFR 254.1. The General Services Administration cross references Appendices C and D as the accessibility standards for all other facilities, except residential facilities, covered by the Architectural Barriers Act at 41CFR 102-76.65. The Department of Housing and Urban Development references the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards, which was issued in 1984, as the accessibility standards for residential facilities covered by the Architectural Barriers Act. See 24 CFR 40.4.

6 We are required to establish and maintain minimum guidelines and requirements for the accessibility standards adopted by the Department of Justice and Department of Transportation for facilities covered by Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. See 29 U.S.C. 792 (b) (3) and 42 U.S.C. 12204.

7 Exceptions are permitted to the technical requirements for viewing areas and for outdoor recreation access routes at camping facilities, picnic facilities, and trailheads only in alterations.

8 The Federal Trail Data Standards are available at: http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/trail-data-standard/.

9 These benefits are documented in California State Parks, The Health and Social Benefits of Recreation, 2005 at: http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/795/files/health_benefits_online_6-1-05.pdf and Geoffrey Godbey, Outdoor Recreation, Health, and Wellness: Understanding and Enhancing the Relationship, 2009 at: http://www.rff.org/rff/documents/rff-dp-09-21.pdf.

10 Americans with Disabilities: 2010 available at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf.