Notes

NOTES

[1] 42 U.S.C. § 4151 (1). In addition to facilities constructed or altered by Federal agencies, the Architectural Barriers Act covers facilities leased by Federal agencies; facilities financed by a Federal grant or loan, if the facilities are subject to design standards issued under the law authorizing the grant or loan; and facilities constructed by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. 42 U.S.C. § 4151 (2) - (4). The accessibility guidelines for outdoor developed areas do not apply to these other facilities.

[2] 29 U.S.C. § 792 (b) (3).

[3] The Architectural Barriers Act requires the General Services Administration to prescribe accessibility standards for facilities covered by the Architectural Barriers Act, except for Department of Defense and certain other facilities. 42 U.S.C. § 4152. The Architectural Barriers Act requires the Department of Defense to prescribe accessibility standards for its facilities, including Army Corps of Engineers facilities. 42 U.S.C. § 4153.

[4] The number of acres and annual visits on the Forest Service lands is from USDA Forest Service, Recreation Quick Facts (http://www.fs.fed.us.recreation/programs/facts/facts_sheet.shtml ). The number of acres and annual visits on the Department of the Interior lands is from information provided by the agencies and DOI Quick Facts (http://mits.doi.gov/quickfacts/tables_all.cfm ). The number of acres and annual visits on the Army Corps of Engineers' lands is from Corps National Camping Facilities (http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/employees/recreation/pdfs/NationalMatrix05.pdf ).

[5] 36 CFR Part 1191. ABAAG is available on the Access Board website at: http://www.access-board.gov/ada-aba.gov . The General Services Administration has adopted ABAAG as the Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Standard (ABAAS) for facilities subject to its authority. 41 CFR § 102-76.60. The Department of Defense plans to adopt ABAAG in July 2007 as the accessibility standard for facilities subject to its authority.

[6] Regulatory negotiation is a supplemental rulemaking process that involves negotiation among various interest groups and the agency to reach consensus on a rule.

[7] The other organization that participated in the regulatory negotiation included the American Society of Landscape Architects; American Camping Association; American Trails; Appalachian Trail Conservancy; Association of Blind Athletes; Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Hawaii Commission on Persons with Disabilities; KOA. Inc.; National State Park Directors; National Association of State Trail Administrators; National Center on Accessibility; National Council on Independent Living; National Park and Recreation Association; National Spinal Cord Injury Association; New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; Paralyzed Veterans of America; Partners for Access to the Woods; Rails to Trails Conservancy; State of Washington, Interagency Committee on Outdoor Recreation; TASH; and Whole Access.

[8] The regulatory negotiation committee's report, “Recommendations for Accessibility Guidelines: Outdoor Developed Areas,” is available on the Access Board website at: http://www.access-board.gov/outdoor-rec-rpt.htm . The Access Board reformatted the regulatory negotiation committee's report for the notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to be consistent with ABAAG's format.

[9] The Americans with Disabilities Act requires facilities constructed or altered by state and local governments, and places of public accommodation and commercial facilities constructed or altered by private entities to be accessible to individuals with disabilities, 42 U.S.C. §§ 12132, 12134, and 12183. The Access Board is required to establish minimum accessibility guidelines for facilities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. 29 U.S.C. § 792 (b) (3) and 42 U.S.C. § 12204.

[10] The Access Board will conduct a separate rulemaking in the future to issue accessibility guidelines for outdoor developed areas constructed or altered by state and local governments and private entities under the Americans with Disabilities Act when sufficient information is available to prepare a regulatory assessment of the impacts of the guidelines on those entities.

 [11] The Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental Disabilities Amendments of 1978 (PL 95-602) amended section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. § 794) to prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability under any program or activity conducted by any Executive agency or by the United States Postal Service, and to require the head of each agency to promulgate regulations to carry out the amendments. Each of the Federal land management agencies has issued regulations pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act that require their newly constructed or altered facilities to be accessible to individuals with disabilities. See: 7 CFR § 15e.151 (Department of Agriculture); 32 CFR § 56.8 (c) (3) (Department of Defense); and 43 CFR § 17.551 (Department of Interior). The Federal land management agencies have issued a series of directives and memoranda to their personnel beginning in the 1980's through the present emphasizing their obligation under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act to make their outdoor recreation facilities accessible to individuals with disabilities. The directives and memoranda are too numerous to reference in this note, but are available on file at the Access Board.

[12] UFAS was adopted as the accessibility standard for Federal facilities in 1984. 49 FR 31528, August 7, 1984 .[13] The practice of using the ANSI standard to design accessible outdoor recreation facilities was illustrated in "A Guide to Designing Accessible Outdoor Recreation Facilities" published by the Department of the Interior in 1980. The publication is available in the Access Board's library.

[14] The provisions for designing accessible camping and picnic areas and trails were published in DESIGN, Summer 1989, "Access to Outdoor Recreation Trails" and DESIGN, Fall 1989, "Accessible Picnic Areas and Campgrounds." DESIGN is a quarterly publication of the National Park Service, Park Practice Program. The publications are available in the Access Board's library.

[15] The design guide is available in the Access Board's library.

[16] FSORAG and FSTAG are available on the Forest Service's website at: http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/accessibility/ .

[17] The amendments to the Forest Service Manual are available on the Forest Service's website at: http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/accessibility/ .

[18] The National Center on Accessibility's best practices bulletins are available on its website at: http://www.ncaonline.org/monographs/index.shtml .

[19] The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" are available on its website at: http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-manuals/em1110-1-400/toc.htm .

[20] The Army Corps of Engineer's accessibility policies, including best practices for accessible design, are on its website at: http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/employees/access/access.html .

[21] As discussed in the subsequent chapters, the Access Board reviewed a sample of the Federal land management agencies' construction and alteration projects. The review showed the percentage of the Department of the Interior projects that met or exceeded the guidelines were as follows: recreational vehicle parking areas 44 percent (4 of 9 projects); picnic tables 70 percent (17 of 24 projects); tent pads 71 percent (5 of 7 projects); pedestal grills 75 percent (9 of 12 projects); fire rings 80 percent (12 of 15 projects); trails 94 percent (17 of 18 projects); and outdoor recreation access routes 100 percent (15 of 15 projects).

[22] The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" require recreational vehicle parking areas to be at least 12 feet wide, and the guidelines require recreational vehicle parking areas to be at least 20 feet wide at accessible camping spaces.

[23] As discussed in the subsequent chapters, the Access Board reviewed a sample of the Federal land management agencies' construction and alteration projects. The review showed that 60 percent of the Army Corps of Engineers projects (3 of 5 projects) provided recreational vehicle parking areas at least 20 feet wide at accessible camping spaces, and that 100 percent of the Army Corps of Engineers projects (4 of 4 projects) met the guidelines for trails.

[24] The Access Board also requested the Federal land management agencies to provide data on other outdoor developed areas projects. As discussed in Chapter 4, the agencies reported that they did not fund any other outdoor developed areas projects that included elements and spaces covered by the guidelines for or that data was not available.

[25] The Forest Service's regulatory assessment is available on its website at: http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/accessibility/ .

[26] The Federal land management agencies selected the projects reviewed by the Access Board. The Access Board requested the agencies to select at least one project from each of their regions, where applicable; and to pick projects that represent diverse settings and terrains. The projects were either funded in FY 2004, or were funded in a prior fiscal year but the work was completed in FY 2004. The Forest Service selected projects that were reviewed in its regulatory assessment for FSORAG and FSTAG. The Forest Service requested that a camping and picnic area project at the White Mountain National Forest , which was reviewed in its regulatory assessment, not be included in this regulatory assessment because there were significant personnel changes at the White Mountain National Forest and it would be difficult to provide additional information about the project. Nine of the trail projects reviewed in the Forest Service's regulatory assessment involved only maintenance and repair work, and are not included in this regulatory assessment because the guidelines do not apply to maintenance and repair work. Another trail project in the Santa Fe National Forest reviewed in the Forest Service's regulatory assessment is not included in this regulatory assessment because the trail did not connect to a designated trail head or an accessible trail, and is not covered by the guidelines. The review included all the camping and picnic area projects funded by the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Bureau of Reclamation in FY 2004 that included the construction or alteration of elements and spaces covered by the guidelines.

[27] The Forest Service's additional annual costs for camping and picnic area and trail projects are from its regulatory assessment for FSORAG and FSTAG. The Forest Service used a different methodology in its regulatory assessment than the Access Board used in this regulatory assessment. The differences between the methodologies are discussed in the subsequent chapters.

[28] Under Executive Order 12866, "economically significant" regulatory actions generally are actions that have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more.

[29] U.S. Census Bureau, Americans With Disabilities: 2002 (http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/disability/sipp/disab02/awd02.html ).

[30] The number of camping and picnic areas provided by the Forest Service is from USDA Forest Service, Recreation Quick Facts (http://www.fs.fed.us.recreation/programs/facts/facts_sheet.shtml ). The number of camping and picnic areas provided by the National Park Service data is from its Asset Management System. The number of camping areas provided by the Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation is from DOI Quick Facts (http://mits.doi.gov/quickfacts/tables_all.cfm ). The number of camping areas provided by the Army Corps of Engineers is from Corps National Camping Facilities (http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/employees/recreation/pdfs/NationalMatrix05.pdf ).

[31] The number of projects and total project costs for the National Park Service is from its Project Management Information System (PMIS). Camping and picnic area projects that are smaller components of larger park wide projects, or are part of annual cyclical maintenance programs, or are funded through external fund raising may not be identified through the PMIS. The number of projects and total project costs for the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and Army Corps of Engineers are from information provided by their regional and field offices in response to data calls.

[32] Additional information on selection of the projects is provided in note 26.

[33] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T218.2.

[34] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T206.2, T207.2, and T208.2.

[35] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T202.3.

[36] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T206.4 and T306.2.

[37] Federal Supply Group 78, Category 192 37B, Park and Recreational Tables, Benches, Outdoor Pool and Patio Furniture and Bleachers (http://www.gsaelibrary.gsa.gov/ElibMain/SinDetails ). The Access Board did not attempt to verify whether the picnic tables actually meet the accessibility guidelines for outdoor developed areas.

[38] As for the other 18 projects, 7 projects did not identify the manufacturers; 6 projects provided picnic tables from manufacturers that are not on the Federal Supply Schedule; and 5 projects provided custom made picnic tables. Some of the projects were contracted out and the contractors may not have used the Federal Supply Schedule.

[39] The costs do not include shipping and assembly. There is no difference in shipping costs and assembly time for accessible and non-accessible designs of the same type picnic table. The cost for an 8 foot long picnic table ranges from $296 to $931 for the non-accessible design, and from $366 to $1001 for the accessible design (or $70 additional cost for the accessible design compared to the non-accessible design made from the same materials) in the same manufacturer's catalogue in July 2006.

[40] The Forest Service projects provided only accessible picnic tables, but seven of the Forest Service projects also reported cost information for comparable models of non-accessible picnic tables for cost comparison. The Forest Service requested that cost information for the comparable model non-accessible picnic tables reported by Shawnee National Forest not be included in Table 2.7 because the accessible picnic tables provided as part the picnic area project included site preparation and installation costs, and the cost information reported for the comparable model non-accessible picnic tables did not include site preparation and installation costs.

[41] The two National Park Service projects, the Bureau of Land Management project, and the Bureau of Reclamation project were picnic area projects. At least 50 percent of the picnic tables provided in picnic areas must be accessible.

[42] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T307.3 and T308.3. The operable parts on fire rings are required to be within reach ranges and meet technical provisions for operable parts.

[43] Federal Supply Group 78, Category 192 371, Park and Playground Equipment (http://www.gsaelibrary.gsa.gov/ElibMain/SinDetails ).

[44] The same fire rings cost $120 for the non-accessible design and $195 for the accessible design (or $75 additional cost for the accessible design compared to the non-accessible design) in the manufacturer's catalogue in July 2006. The fire rings have a single wall and single level cooking grate. A heat shield option is available on the accessible fire ring for $48. The fire rings are also available in other diameters and heights.

[45] Some manufacturers make non-accessible fire rings only with a single wall and accessible fire rings only with a dual wall, and the additional costs for accessible fire rings made by these manufacturers are on the high end of range.

[46] The Forest Service projects provided only accessible fire rings, but seven of the Forest Service projects also reported cost information for comparable models of non-accessible fire rings for cost comparison. The Wasatch-Cache National Forest reported that accessible fire rings cost $300 more than non-accessible fire rings. This figure is not included the last column of Table 2.10 to be consistent with the regulatory assessment prepared by the Forest Service for FSORAG and FSTAG. The Wasatch-Cache National Forest prefers accessible fire rings over the non-accessible fire rings because accessible fire rings offer other external benefits, including increased facility for children and the elderly. The next highest range of additional costs for accessible fire rings, which is $120 as reported by Gallatin National Forest , is used in the last column of Table 2.10.

[47] The National Park Service project replaced 200 fire rings in a camping area, and provided only 2 accessible fire rings. At least 8 accessible fire rings must be provided in camping areas with 200 camping spaces.

[48] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T308.3.

[49] Three Forest Service projects and a Bureau of Land Management project reported additional costs ranging from $5 to $100 for accessible pedestal grills.

[50] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T209.1 and T309.3.

[51] One Forest Service project reported $30 additional costs for accessible trash containers.

[52] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T217.1, T317.3, and T317.4.

[53] Two Forest Service Projects reported additional costs of $350 and $700 for water hydrant spouts. The spout that cost an additional $700 has an automatic shut-off. The accessibility guidelines for outdoor developed areas do not require an automatic shut-off.

[54] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T217.1and T317.4.

[55] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T213.2, T313.3, T313.4, and T313.5.

[56] The accessibility guidelines for outdoor developed areas require accessible camping spaces to be identified by signs. Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T222 and T322. Signs are not required where all the camping spaces are accessible, or where the spaces are assigned upon arrival or through a reservation system. The Federal land management agencies have established reservation systems for their camping areas as part of the E-government initiative, and would not be required to provide signs at accessible camping spaces. Information on the Federal land management agencies' reservations systems is available on the web at: http://www.recreation.gov/reservinf.jsp .

[57] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T218.2.

[58] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T202.3.

[59] The number of accessible camping spaces required in an alteration is based on the total number of camping spaces in the camping area, and not the number of camping spaces altered. The example assumes that none of the camping spaces in the camping area were accessible prior to the alteration. If 3 of the camping spaces were accessible prior to the alteration, none of the altered camping spaces are required to be accessible because the total number of accessible camping spaces required for new construction (i.e., 3 accessible camping spaces in a camping area with 30 camping spaces) was met.

[60]The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" (http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-manuals/em1110-1-400/toc.htm ) require recreational vehicle parking areas to be at least 12 feet wide and 70 feet long to accommodate a trailer plus a towing vehicle such as a car or truck. The Bureau of Reclamation "Recreation Facility Design Guidelines" (www.usbr.gov/pmts/architecture/recfac/) provide for recreational vehicle parking areas to be at least 14 feet wide and 60 feet long. The Army Corps of Engineers standards and Bureau of Reclamation guidelines recommend that recreational vehicle parking areas have hardened surfaces for public convenience and ease of maintenance.

[61] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T318.2.1. Accessible recreational vehicle parking areas are required to meet technical provisions for slope.

[62] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T218.2.1 Exception and T318.2.2.

[63] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T218.3 and T318.2.3. Accessible parking spaces and access aisles in general parking areas are required to have a firm and stable surface and meet technical provisions for slope.

[64] The Forest Service project provided one 20 feet wide and nine 16 feet wide recreational vehicle parking areas. The National Park Service project provided thirty 16 feet wide recreational vehicle parking areas. The Bureau of Reclamation project provided one 16 feet wide recreational vehicle parking area. One Army Corps of Engineers project provided 12 feet wide recreational vehicle parking areas. The other Army Corps of Engineers project did not provide any information about the width of the recreational vehicle parking areas.

[65] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T318.3. Accessible tent pads and tent platforms and the surrounding clear space are required to have a firm and stable ground surface and meet technical provisions for slope. Accessible tent platforms are also required to have edge protection and a means to access the tent platforms.

[66] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T204 and T304. Outdoor recreation access routes are required to have a firm and stable ground surface and meet technical provisions for clear tread width, openings, obstacles, passing space, cross slope and running slope, resting intervals, edge protection, and protruding objects.

[67] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T204.2, Exception 2.

[68] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T202.3.

[69] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T202.3 Exception, T306.2, T306.3, T 306.4, T307.2, T308.2, T309.2, T313.2, T317.2. The minimum size of the clear spaces vary from 30 inches by 48 inches at accessible trash containers, benches, utilities, and wheelchair spaces at picnic tables; 48 inches by 48 inches at accessible fire rings and pedestal grills; 60 inches by 60 inches at accessible water hydrant spouts; and 3 feet wide around accessible picnic tables. The clear spaces are also required to meet technical provisions for slope.

[70] Many projects provided pads in all the camping spaces and picnic sites for public convenience and ease of maintenance. The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" (http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-manuals/em1110-1-400/toc.htm ) require all campsites to have pads that are up to 625 square feet. The Bureau of Reclamation Recreation "Facility Design Guidelines" (www.usbr.gov/pmts/architecture/recfac/ provide for all campsites to have pads that are 650 square feet.

[71] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T304.x.

[72] Many projects provided firm and stable ground surfaces at all the tent pads for public convenience and ease of maintenance. The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" (http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-manuals/em1110-1-400/toc.htm ) require all tent pads to have firm and stable ground surfaces such as crushed stone screenings for a durable all-weather surface. The Bureau of Reclamation "Recreation Facility Design Guidelines" (www.usbr.gov/pmts/architecture/recfac/ ) provide for all tent pads to have firm and stable ground surfaces.

[73] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T318.3.2.

[74] Many projects provided routes with firm and stable ground surfaces for public convenience and ease of maintenance. The Army Corps of Engineers "Recreation Facility and Customer Service Standards" (http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-manuals/em1110-1-400/toc.htm ) require all campsites to provide routes with firm and stable ground surfaces to the pads where the picnic tables, fire rings and pedestal grills are located.

[75] The Forest Service's additional annual costs for camping and picnic area projects are from its regulatory assessment for FSORAG and FSTAG. The Forest Service used a different methodology in its regulatory assessment than the Access Board used in this regulatory assessment. The Forest Service asked the personnel who worked on the 13 projects reviewed for its regulatory assessment whether accessible designs would be used in the absence of accessibility requirements. The Forest Service personnel from 7 projects responded that accessible designs would be used for all the elements and spaces in project in the absence of accessibility requirements because the public prefers accessible designs or there were other reasons for using accessible designs. The Forest Service personnel from the other 6 projects responded that accessible designs would be used for only some of the elements and spaces in the project in the absence of accessibility requirements because the public prefers accessible designs or there were other reasons for using accessible designs. The Forest Service estimated the percentage increase in the project costs for accessible designs used solely to meet accessibility requirements to range from 0 percent to 4.7 percent. The Forest Service reported that it expended $6.9 million in FY 2003 on camping and picnic projects that would be subject to FSORAG, and multiplied this expenditure by 0 percent and 4.7 percent to estimate the lower and upper range of additional annual costs associated with FSORAG if accessibility were not required.

[76] The Forest Service trail miles are based on in its Infra System as of May 2006. Not all units completed reporting to the data base. The Forest Service extrapolated the data nationwide. The National Park Service trail miles are based on its Facility Management Software System as of July 2006.

[77] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T104.4, T201.1, T202.3, and T203.1.

[78] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T104.1 and T202.3, and Advisory T202.3.

[79] The Forest Service extrapolated from the proportion of hiker/pedestrian trail miles to total trail miles on its lands that 254 to 267 of the trail miles improved in FY 2005 are designated hiker/pedestrian trails. The Forest Service further extrapolated from a review of trail projects funded in FY 2003 at 13 national forests and a national scenic trail that 28 to 30 of the estimated 254 to 267 hiker/pedestrian trail miles improved in FY 2005 connect to a designated trailhead or an accessible trail.

[80] The number of projects and total project costs for the National Park Service is from its Project Management Information System (PMIS). Trail projects that are funded through external fund raising, or constructed or altered by volunteer organizations may not be identified through the PMIS. The number of projects and total project costs for the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and Army Corps of Engineers are from information provided by their regional and field offices in response to data calls.

[81] Additional information on selection of the projects is provided in note 26.

[82] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T303.2. The segment of the trail between the trailhead and the first point where the specific exceptions apply is exempt from the technical provisions if the trail segment is 500 feet or less in distance, unless there is a prominent feature on the trail segment in which case the segment of the trail between the trailhead and the prominent feature must comply with the technical provisions.

[83] Three projects claimed a specific exception for the technical provision for edge protection. There is no specific exception for edge protection. The technical provision for edge protection only applies where edge protection is provided. The persons completing the data form may not have understood the application of the technical provision for edge protection, and claimed a specific exception where no edge protection was provided.

[84] The Forest Service's additional annual costs for trail projects are from its regulatory assessment for FSORAG and FSTAG. The Forest Service used a different methodology in its regulatory assessment than the Access Board used in this regulatory assessment. The Forest Service improved 1,378 trail miles in FY 2005. The Forest Service extrapolated from its total trail miles and trail miles designated for hiker/pedestrian use that 28 to 30 of the improved trail miles would be subject to FSTAG. The Forest Service further extrapolated from a review of 5 trail construction projects funded in FY 2003 that 20 percent of the 28 to 30 trail miles improved in FY 2005 that would be subject to FSTAG would incur additional costs associated with FSTAG and that the additional costs per mile for accessible design would be $29,700.

[85] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T205 and T305. Beach access routes are required to meet technical provisions for openings, obstacles, passing space, turning space, cross slope and running slope, edge protection, and protruding objects.

[86] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T205.3.

[87] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, section T205.3, Exception 1.

[88] Information on beach access route products is available on the National Center on Accessibility website: http://www.ncaonline.org/products/index.php4?cat=Beach%20Surfaces .

[89] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T220 and T320. On post mounted showers, a vertical or circular grab bar must be affixed to the post. On wall mounted showers, a horizontal grab bar must be affixed to the wall. One spray head must be located between 48 inches and 54 inches above the ground or floor, and the other spray head must be located at least 72 inches above the ground or floor.

[90] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T211 and T311.

[91] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T212 and T312.

[92] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T219, T319, and T408.

[93] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T210 and T310.

[94] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T215 and T315.

[95] American Bicycle Security Company, Wheel Chair Security Locker, Model 201CW. Information on the locker is available on the web at: http://www.ameribike.com/catalog/bike/200-series/200.html .

[96] Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines, sections T216, T316, and T409.

[97] The Forest Service did not address in its regulatory assessment of FSORAG and FSTAG the additional costs associated with FSORAG for the other elements and spaces discussed in this chapter in the absence of accessibility requirements.