Outdoor Recreation Access Routes

Definitions.

Outdoor Recreation Access Route.
The outdoor recreation access route is a continuous unobstructed path designated for pedestrian use that connects accessible elements within a picnic area, camping area, or designated trailhead. Examples include the paths connecting parking spaces to a picnic or camp unit, or a picnic unit to a toilet building, or those connecting accessible picnic tables to other accessible camping elements. Outdoor recreation access routes do not include pathways such as sidewalks, pathways in amusement parks, visitor center, commercial theme parks, or carnivals and between buildings on college campuses already addressed by ADAAG 4.3.

Outdoor recreation access routes are required to connect elements required to be accessible in this section. For example, where a cooking grill and a picnic table are provided in an accessible camp site, the outdoor recreation route is required to connect these elements. Elements such as benches, picnic tables, etc. located along a trail, however, are not required to be connected by an outdoor recreation access route.

Proposed 16.3.1 requires the surface of the outdoor recreation access route to be firm and stable. This is consistent with the surface provision proposed for trails and other outdoor elements.

Proposed 16.3.2 requires the clear tread width of the outdoor recreation access route to be 36 inches minimum. An exception permits the width to be the minimum necessary or 32 inches for a distance of 24 inches where one or more of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.3.3 addresses openings and does not permit passage of a ½ inch diameter sphere. Elongated openings shall be placed so that the long dimension is perpendicular or diagonal to the dominant direction of travel. An exception permits the openings to run parallel so long as the opening does not permit passage of 1/4 inch diameter sphere.

Proposed 16.3.4 requires protruding objects on outdoor recreation access routes to comply with ADAAG 4.4.

Proposed 16.3.5 requires that tread obstacles not exceed 1 inch high maximum. Exception 1 permits a 2 inch high obstacle where it is beveled and where at least one of the conditions in 16.1.1 applies. Tread obstacles may occur where surface material changes, such as asphalt surfaces leading up to a concrete slab.

Proposed 16.3.6 requires passing space where the clear width of the outdoor recreation access route is less than 60 inches. Passing space are required at intervals of 200 feet maximum. This is consistent with ADAAG. Committee members determined that outdoor recreation access routes were more like an indoor accessible route than a trail. The passing space shall be either a 60 inch by 60 inch space or an intersection of two walking surfaces which provide a T-shaped spaces complying with ADAAG 4.2.3, provided that the arms and stem of the T-shaped space extend at least 48 inches beyond the intersection. An exception permits the passing spaces to be at intervals not to exceed 300 feet. This was added to address settings where it may not be possible to provide passing space within a 200 feet minimum interval, such as environmentally sensitive areas.

Proposed 16.3.7 addresses both the cross slope and the running slope of the outdoor recreation access route. Proposed 16.3.7 permits a 1:33 maximum cross slope for outdoor recreation access routes. An exception permits a 1:20 cross slope where necessary to ensure proper drainage. Natural or naturally appearing surfaces often require greater than 1:50 cross slopes to ensure proper drainage. Committee members agreed that water ponding on an outdoor recreation access routes may make the route inaccessible, therefore a greater cross slope than permitted by ADAAG is proposed.

Proposed 16.3.7.2 addresses running slope. Designers have a choice of applying one or more of the technical provisions in this section. Proposed 16.3.7.2.1 permits running slope to be 1:20 or less for any distance. Proposed 16.3.7.2.2 permits running slope to be 1:12 maximum for 50 feet maximum. Resting intervals complying with 16.2.8 shall be provided at distances no greater than 50 feet apart. Proposed 16.3.7.2.3 permits running slope shall be 1:10 maximum for 30 feet maximum. Resting intervals complying with 16.2.8 shall be provided at distances no greater than 30 feet apart.

Question 8. The committee was unable to decide whether there should be an option to depart from the technical provisions for outdoor recreation access routes. Currently, departures from the technical provisions are permitted for specific elements, (e.g., picnic tables, camp sites) but not for the outdoor recreation access routes that connect those elements. Specific comment is requested on whether the departures permitted for specific elements should also be permitted on the outdoor recreation access routes leading to those elements.

Question 9. The committee also discussed potential departures from the provisions for slope on an outdoor recreation access route, unrelated to whether or not the elements themselves complied with the technical provisions. The committee considered two options. One option provided a maximum for the total length of the outdoor recreation access route that could exceed a 1:12 slope. The committee considered that either 10 percent or 15 percent of the total length of the outdoor recreation access route could exceed a 1:12 slope. The second option was to apply the use of the departures in 16.1.1 to the technical provisions for the slope of an outdoor recreation access route. Specific comment is requested on this issue.

Proposed 16.3.8 requires resting intervals to be 60 inches minimum in length and have a width of at least as wide as the route connecting it. The slope shall not exceed 1:33 in any direction. Where the surface conditions require slopes greater than 1:33 for proper drainage, a 1:20 slope is permitted.

Proposed 16.3.9 requires edge protection, where provided, to be 3 inches minimum in height. This is consistent with the proposed provision for trails.

BEACH ACCESS ROUTES

Definition.

Beach Access Route.
The term "beach access route " has been defined as a continuous unobstructed path designated for pedestrian use that crosses the surface of the beach. Beaches can be found in three general aquatic environments; coastal areas, along rivers, and along lakes and ponds. Although the term "beach" is not defined, the committee broadly considered this to include designated areas along a shore of a body of water providing pedestrian entry for the purposes of water play, swimming, or other water shoreline activities. A beach access route is a designated path and different from an area where entry into the water is possible, but not provided.

A beach access route is a pathway over the surface of the beach itself, not the route leading to the edge of the beach surface. When a beach is fronted by a park or other outdoor developed area, the route over the surface to the edge and beginning of the beach surface may be considered an outdoor recreation access route addressed by 16.3.

The proposed accessibility guidelines for beaches include two scoping provisions. Proposed 16.4.1.1 addresses new beaches and proposed 16.4.1.2 addresses existing beaches. Proposed 16.4.1.1 addresses a new beaches. A "new beach" refers to sites where a man-made beach is created through the importation of sand or other beach surface to create a new beach where none previously existed. The proposed guidelines treat "new beaches" differently from "existing beaches". A beach access route is required in new construction. The committee agreed that the opportunity to provide access is greater with a newly constructed beach. The committee also considered the option of a scoping requirement based upon the volume of new beach created, but due to the difficulty in measuring a changing volume of sand, did not include that option.

Proposed 16.4.1.1 requires that where a new beach is constructed, a minimum of one beach access route complying with 16.4.2 through 16.4.10, shall be provided for every ½ mile of linear feet of new beach. The committee believed that the number of beach access routes required by 16.4, however, should be linked to the size of the new beach and based upon linear feet of new beach created. The committee considered that ½ mile was a reasonable distance between beach access routes on a new beach.

Question 10. Public comment is specifically requested on the impact of constructing a beach access route for every ½ mile along a new beach. If this distance is not appropriate, other specific distances are requested.

The proposed rule requires that a beach access route extend to the high tide level, mean river bed level, or the normal recreation pool level. The committee believed that different lines of "demarcation" would vary depending upon the location of the beach. The committee selected the high tide level for coastal beach, the mean river bed level for river beaches, and the normal recreation water level for lakes and reservoirs. Beach access to the water will vary considerably between geographic locations under this definition because the tidal difference between high and low tides varies from place to place. For example, a beach in Alaska may experience tidal differences of tens or even hundreds of feet; beaches in Florida will have much smaller differences between low and high tides. The high tide mark is a reasonable location to terminate permanent structures as built facilities, below this point it is much more likely to wash out. The mean river bed level and the normal recreation water level are comparable for rivers and lakes, respectively.

Question 11. The committee is interested in the appropriateness of those markers and the ability to determine those level at most beaches.

Question 12. The committee outlined several exceptions to the application of these technical provisions. The committee requests information about whether there are any other situations for which site infeasibility would preclude compliance with the minimum requirements for a beach access route. If so, are there specific technical provisions (16.4.2 through 16.4.10) where departures may be necessary due to site constraints?

Proposed 16.4.1.2 addresses new construction of a beach access route for an existing beach. Where a pedestrian route is provided from a developed site to the edge of an existing beach surface, a beach access route complying with 16.4.2 through 16.4.10 shall be provided and extend to the high tide level, mean river bed level, or to the normal recreation water level. This provision addresses a situation when an entity decides to construct a pedestrian route which is used by everyone to access the beach. In that situation, the action will trigger an obligation to address access for persons with disabilities. The committee did not limit the obligation to only when an entity constructs a path perpendicular to a beach edge because few such paths are developed. The committee also intended to include pedestrian sidewalks or boardwalks along the beach as "pedestrian routes to the edge of an "existing beach."

Question 13. The committee considered beach sites where constructed parking spaces or a parking lot is provided adjoining the beach. Should the provision of constructed parking spaces adjoining the beach, trigger a beach access route? If so, should the trigger be based on the number of parking spaces or some other measure?

The committee discussed several options and decided that the obligation to provide a beach access route over the surface of the beach would be triggered when a pedestrian access route to the edge of the beach surface is provided. The committee recognized that this would obligate an entity to extend a path further than they might have originally intended with their developed pedestrian path. However, the committee felt strongly that a developed path which ends at the edge of the beach surface would be of little use to a person with a disability who wishes to traverse the beach itself. They also believed that this requirement was reasonable since the provision allows the beach access route to be either temporary or permanent. Designers and operators can decide the type of route appropriate given the different environments. The committee determined that the beach route would be required to the same point appropriate for either an ocean, river, lake, or reservoir, (see same discussion as 16.4.1.1 for high tide level, mean river bed level, or the normal recreation water level.)

Several exceptions are permitted for routes on existing beaches. Proposed exception 1 permits the use of a "temporary" beach access route where one is required. The committee believed that requiring a permanent structure was far too restrictive from a design or environmental perspective. In particular, constraints of the environment may limit or preclude the construction of permanent structures. Permanent structures may also require additional permits in coastal and shoreline areas. Wave action can also cause significant erosion which can shortly turn a permanent structure into a hazard. Therefore, entities can chose to use a temporary structure for administrative and operational reasons. Vehicular access or access provided by an assistive device would not meet the technical provisions of an beach access route. While these options may enhance access to the beach for persons with disabilities, these are not considered "temporary structures." The committee intended that temporary structures be in place during all hours where the public has access to the beach.

Proposed exception 2 exempts routes created solely for shoreline maintenance from complying with 16.4.1.2. The committee recommended exempting those routes which are strictly established for shoreline maintenance personnel, particularly if accessed by a vehicle.

Proposed exception 3 exempts routes created solely as undeveloped public easements from complying with proposed 16.4.1.2. The committee recommended an exemption if a "route" is merely an open public easement and right of way, an undeveloped space or opening created between developments where a developer leaves space open under the requirements of state or local laws for shoreline access.

Proposed exception 4 exempts a beach access route from being required where another beach access route exists within ½ mile and is within the beach of the same jurisdiction. The committee recommended that if a beach access route already exists to the beach in close proximity, there would be no requirement to create another beach access route. The committee considered one half mile, to be a reasonable distance, so long as the existing beach route is served by the same beach. This is similar to the philosophy that all entrances into the same building do not have to be accessible. The ½ mile is also consistent with the requirement for scoping for a second route with construction of a new beach.

Proposed exception 5 distinguishes beach replenishment from alterations. Nourishment is the process of replenishing a beach. While it can occur naturally with the depositing of sand from wave action, it is more commonly accomplished artificially by mechanically depositing sand on the beach. A beach may completely erode before it is artificially nourished, or it may be nourished on a periodic schedule to maintain the desired amount of beach for use or to act as a barrier for adjoining buildings and facilities. Proposed exception 6 permits the process of beach nourishment without triggering alteration provision. The committee did not believe that such activities should trigger any obligations for a beach access route over the surface of the beach.

Question 14. The committee asks whether there is a need to distinguish between certain beach nourishment projects. In particular, the committee is concerned about those projects where there is a substantial increase in the volume of the beach area. Should certain beach nourishment activities/projects trigger the requirements of a beach access route? If so, how should these projects be identified or defined?

Proposed exception 6 provides an exception where the pedestrian route which is developed along the edge of an existing beach is elevated higher than 6 inches above the beach surface. This exception is intended to address those situations where a lengthy pedestrian route such as a sidewalk fronts the length of the beach and the route is elevated higher than 6 inches. The committee recognized that those areas would be drop-offs where the creation of a beach access route would require 6 feet of ramp to be constructed to meet the beach surface.

Proposed 16.4.2 requires the surface of the required beach access route to be firm and stable. This deviates from current ADAAG in that it does not require slip resistance. Given the existence of loose material natural to a beach environment such as sand, algae, and barnacles, the committee decided that slip resistance is not an appropriate requirement for a beach access route. This is consistent with the provisions for other outdoor elements. Where a temporary route is provided, it must also meet this provision.

Proposed 16.4.3 requires the clear tread width of the beach access route to be 36 inches minimum. This requirement is consistent with ADAAG and the proposed technical requirement for the clear tread width of other outdoor accessible routes. Unlike other requirements for the clear width of trails and outdoor recreation access routes, no reduction in the width in permitted. Since the beach access route will most likely be adjacent to sand, maintaining the 36 inch width is critical to avoid being caught off the path on a nontravesable sandy surface. The need for additional space for passing and resting has been included in other provisions.

Proposed 16.4.4 requires openings in the surfaces of the beach access route shall be of a size that does not permit passage of a ½ inch diameter sphere. Elongated openings shall be placed so that the long dimension is perpendicular or diagonal to the dominant direction of travel. This is consistent with ADAAG and the proposed technical provisions for other outdoor recreation access routes. An exception permits the elongated openings to run parallel to the dominate direction of travel, where the opening does not permit passage of a 1/4 inch sphere.

Proposed 16.4.5 requires protruding objects shall comply with ADAAG 4.4. This is consistent with ADAAG and the proposed technical specification for protruding objects on outdoor recreation access routes.

Proposed 16.4.6 requires passing space where the clear width of the beach access route is less than 60 inches, passing space shall be provided at intervals of 200 feet. Passing space shall be either a 60 inch by 60 inch minimum or an intersection of two walking surfaces which provide a T-shaped space complying with ADAAG 2.3, provided that the arms and stem of the T-shaped space extend at least 48 inches beyond the intersection. This is consistent with ADAAG 4.2.3 and the proposed technical provision for passing space on an outdoor access route.

Proposed 16.4.7 requires a maneuvering space/resting space at the end of the beach access route or at the high tide level, mean river bed level, normal recreation water level. Maneuvering space shall not overlap the beach access route and shall be either a 60 in minimum by 60 in minimum space, or an intersection of two walking surfaces which provide a T-shaped space complying with ADAAG 4.2.3 provided that the arms and stem of the T-shaped space extend at least 48 inches beyond the intersection.

A resting or maneuvering space allows a person with a disability to be out of the route of travel, to leave his/her chair while transferring into a beach terrain vehicle, or simply to wait in a place outside the flow of traffic. The location of this resting or maneuvering space should be in an area which is dry. If the route extends further than the minimum distance required, the resting or maneuvering space may be placed at the end of the beach access route, although the location may not always remain dry.

Proposed 16.4.8 address both cross slope and running slope of beach access routes. Proposed 16.4.8.1 requires the maximum cross slope of a beach access route to not exceed 1:33. An exception permits cross slopes of 1:20 maximum for drainage. This deviates from ADAAG, but is consistent with the proposed technical requirements for cross slope of an outdoor recreation route. The deviation is necessary for drainage in the outdoor environment with outdoor surfaces.

Proposed 16.4.8.2 addresses running slope. Designers have a choice of applying one or more of the technical provisions in this section. Proposed 16.4.8.2.1 permits running slope to be 1:20 or less for any distance. Proposed 16.4.8.2.2 permits running slope to be 1:12 maximum for 50 feet maximum. Resting intervals complying with 16.2.8 shall be provided at distances no greater than 50 feet apart. Proposed 16.4.8.2.3 permits running slope shall be 1:10 maximum for 30 feet maximum. Resting intervals complying with 16.2.8 shall be provided at distances no greater than 30 feet apart. The rationale for requiring a resting interval is the same as for trails or outdoor recreation access routes. The running slope provisions are the same as those for an outdoor recreation access route.

ADAAG 4.8 does not apply to this section and thus there are not provisions for handrails. The committee believed that providing handrails in this environment was not realistic, nor desirable. Therefore, the committee decided to depart from ADAAG by permitting greater slopes for a limited distance without triggering the requirement for handrails. The committee felt that the handrails would be a hazard for perpendicular traffic and a barrier for beach vehicles such as emergency ambulances, etc. Furthermore, the handrails would limit a person's ability to get off the beach route until end of the route, which in many cases would be more restrictive.

Proposed 16.4.9 limits the obstacles in the beach access route to be 1 inch high maximum. This departs from ADAAG but is consistent with the proposed technical requirements for tread obstacles for an outdoor access route. This departure is necessary due to the uniqueness of the outdoor environment.

Proposed 16.4.10 requires edge protection where drop-offs from the beach access route to the beach are 6 inches or higher. The edge protection shall include curbs, walls, or projecting surfaces that prevent people from falling off the route. Edge protection must be a minimum of 2 inches high. If the drop-off is greater than 1 inch, but less than 6 inches, then the edge must be beveled.

While a raised edge may be considered a tripping hazard in some instances, the committee recognized that in some locations, an elevated route such as that created by a boardwalk might necessitate a raised edge for safety. Where these locations occur, the elevation of the route is already an impediment to the perpendicular traffic and the addition of edge protection would not create any more of a tripping hazard than that already created by the elevated route itself. Therefore, the committee recommended that those elevated routes, defined as 6 inches or above, the beach surface, have a requirement for edge protection equivalent to the edge protection requirement in current ADAAG for ramps. If the height of the route is greater than 1 inch but less than 6 inches, the committee felt that edge protection was not required, although the edge should be beveled. If the height of the route is 1 inch or less, then there is no requirement for beveling, as an inch or less elevation is virtually a flat route and is a reasonable to expect in a beach environment given the shifting of sand.

Question 15. The committee did not require a beach access route to extend beyond the high tide level, mean river bed level, or normal recreation water level. If an entity decides to provide the route into the water, the committee asks whether technical specifications should be required, if so, the committee seeks input as to whether the technical provisions for sloped entry into pools should be applied in these cases.

FIXED PICNIC TABLES

Proposed section 16.5.1.1 requires that where one fixed picnic table is provided in a picnic area, it shall be accessible and comply with 16.5. The table shall also be located along an outdoor recreation access route complying with 16.3. This section is included in order to ensure that a picnic area with only one table is accessible to and usable by people with disabilities. If only one table is provided, and it is not accessible, people with disabilities would not have the option of choosing another table.

Proposed section 16.5.1.2 requires that where two or more fixed picnic tables are provided in a picnic area, at least 50 percent, but no less than two, shall comply with 16.5. Of the picnic tables required to be accessible, 40 percent, but never less than two, shall be located along an outdoor recreation access route. For example, if ten tables are provided in a picnic area, this provision would require five tables to be accessible. In addition, of the five required to be accessible, 40 percent, or two, would need to be located along an outdoor recreation access route.

This provision applies only to picnic tables that are "fixed" to the ground, (i.e. permanently attached such as by a chain from the table to a concrete footing below ground). Some committee members initially proposed 100 percent scoping, requiring all tables to be accessible. Other members considered 100 percent too high and more than what is currently required in ADAAG for the built environment. After much debate, committee members agreed that 50 percent scoping would adequately accommodate the demand for accessible tables. Committee members considered this to be realistic and feasible for most outdoor recreation providers, and would result in a higher number of accessible tables in smaller picnic areas.

In the outdoor recreation environment, the natural terrain often presents a real obstacle. Although this would not affect the accessibility of the table itself, it could impact getting to the table. The committee realized that in many picnic areas, it might not be possible to locate all accessible tables along an outdoor recreation access route. Rather than decreasing the number of accessible tables, the decision was made to reduce the scoping for accessible route connections. While some committee members wanted all accessible tables to be located along an access route, other committee members felt that would be unrealistic in the outdoor environment given constraints of the natural terrain. The committee finally reached consensus on requiring 40 percent of the accessible tables to be located along the outdoor recreation access route.

The proposed scoping provision addresses picnic tables located in an "area." An "area" refers to a designated location when picnic related elements are located. For instance, a picnic "area" is a designated location where picnic related elements are located Areas may be separated and include different settings on the same site. For example, a picnic area located next to a lake in a park is considered a separate picnic area from a pavilion with numerous picnic tables within the same park. Picnic "areas" may also be separated and designated by a name or connected to a separate entrance road.

Proposed 16.5.2 requires accessible tables to be dispersed among the various types of picnic settings or opportunities provided. For example, a particular picnic area may offer picnic sites near the lake, in the woods, and in the open, sunny portion of the area. This provision requires that the number of accessible tables be distributed throughout the area, so that people with disabilities would have a choice of picnic locations similar to what other visitors to the area have. This section would not increase the total number of accessible tables required in 16.5.1.2.

Proposed 16.5.3 addresses wheelchair seating spaces and requires at least one wheelchair seating space at an accessible picnic table. Where the table top perimeter exceeds 24 linear feet, the number of accessible seating spaces shall comply with the table 16.5.3. More accessible seating spaces would be required where the perimeter of the table top (not including the bench) exceeded 24 linear feet. The location of the accessible seating space(s) would be left to the discretion of the designer, although the appendix notes recommend that the accessible spaces be dispersed rather than clustered in one location.

Committee members discussed this issue at length, finally basing the number of accessible seating spaces on an average table dimensioned at ten-foot long by 2-1/2 foot wide. Such a table has a perimeter of 25 linear feet and is designed to accommodate up to ten people. The committee decided tables of that size should provide two accessible seating spaces, while smaller tables should only require one accessible space. Tables with a perimeter of 45 to 64 linear feet, i.e. if at least two but less than three ten-foot long tables were joined together, would require three accessible seating spaces. Tables with 65 to 84 linear feet would require four accessible spaces, and so on.

Proposed 16.5.4 addresses the technical provisions for the wheelchair seating space. Each accessible seating space will provide knee space of at least 30 inches wide, 19 inches deep, and 27 inches from ground/floor to the bottom of the table top. This provision departs from ADAAG in that it also requires a toe clearance of 9 inches above the ground/floor extending for a total depth of 24 inches. This is an additional 5 inches minimum beyond the 19-inch knee space depth in current ADAAG. This ensures that adequate toe clearance is provided at tables that have a solid leg at each end (rather than an A-shape frame or individual legs). A 19-inch deep space at the end of a solid leg table would not allow a person using a wheelchair to be sufficiently close to the table.

Proposed 16.5.5 addresses table clearance. This provision departs from current ADAAG by requiring a 36-inch minimum clear space surrounding the usable portions of a table, measured from the outside edge of the seat, or the outside edge of the table if no seat is provided.

Tables placed in buildings are generally expected to have ample space for moving around. This is not always the case where picnic tables are located in the outdoor environment. For that reason, the committee recommends a minimum clear space that would provide maneuvering room beyond the accessible seating space to all usable portions of the table to allow for movement around the table.

Proposed 16.5.6 addresses surfaces. This provision requires the surface of the clear space and accessible seating space to be firm and stable. Slip resistance is not required because of the tree leaves and needles, duff (partly decayed organic material on the forest floor), mud, snow, ice, etc. that often cover outdoor areas. Exception 1 permits departure from this requirement where at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies.

Proposed 16.5.7 requires slopesof the required clear spaces not to exceed 1:50 in any direction, which is consistent with current ADAAG. Exceptions are provided to address the unique aspects of the outdoor environment. Natural and natural-appearing surfaces are often used in picnic areas. A !:50 slope on these surfaces may not be adequate to ensure proper drainage. In these cases, exception 1 allows the slope in any direction to be 1:33 maximum. Exception 2 states that this provision does not have to be met where at least one of the conditions in proposed section 16.1.1 applies.

FIRE RINGS

Proposed 16.6.1.1 requires that where only one fire ring is provided in a picnic area, it shall comply with 16.6.3 through 16.6.7 and be connected to an outdoor recreation access route complying with 16.3.

Proposed section 16.6.1.2 requires that where two or more fire rings are provided in a picnic area, at least 50 percent, but not less than 2, shall comply with section 16.6. In addition, of the 50 percent required to be accessible, 40 percent shall be located along an outdoor recreation access route. This proposed provision is consistent with other outdoor elements proposed in this section.

Proposed 16.6.2 requires that the accessible fire rings be located throughout the picnic area and dispersed among the types of fire rings, if different styles or designs are provided. For example, a picnic area may provide fire rings without cooking surfaces (i.e. for camp fires only) and some with cooking surfaces. In addition, this picnic area may offer picnic sites nestled in the trees, some near the water, and others in open meadows. This section would require that accessible fire rings be available in both types and distributed among the different picnic sites, affording people with disabilities the same choice of fire ring location that is available to other visitors. This provision does not require an increase in the total number of accessible picnic tables.

Proposed 16.6.3 requires a clear space extending a minimum of 48 inches deep by 48 inches wide be provided at all usable portions of the fire ring. This clear space exceeds what is generally required in current ADAAG to allow both a forward and parallel approach and provide more space to move away from the heat. Exception 1 permits the clear space to be reduced to no less than 36 inches deep by 36 inches wide when one of the conditions of 16.1.1 exists. A clear space of less than 36 inches x 36 inches at accessible fire rings could pose a safety hazard to users. As a result, no exception is provided to further reduce the clear space requirement to less than 36 inches by 36 inches.

Proposed 16.6.4 requires the fire surface heightto be 9 inches minimum above the ground/floor and is consistent with the current ADAAG specifications for the dimensions for low side reach.

Proposed 16.6.5 addresses raised edges around fire rings.In this situation, the edge/curb is viewed as the obstruction.Where a raised edge or curb is provided around a fire ring, this proposed section would require that the combined reach over the edge/curb and down to the fire building surface shall comply with ADAAG 4.2.6.

Proposed 16.6.6 requires the slope of the clear space required by 16.6.3 to not exceed 1:50 in any direction. This is consistent with current ADAAG. However, many natural and natural-appearing surfaces used in the outdoor environment require more than 1:50 slope for proper drainage. Exception 1 permits the slope of the clear space to be 1:33 maximum in any direction. In the event that at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies, the slope of the clear space is not required to meet this provision.

Proposed 16.6.7 requires the surface of the clear space at the usable portions of the fire ring to be firm and stable. Consistent with other clear space requirements around outdoor elements, slip resistance is not required. If at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies, the requirements of a stable and firm surface of the clear space is not required.

COOKING SURFACES, GRILLS, PEDESTAL GRILLS

Proposed 16.7.1.1 requires that where only one cooking surface, grill, or pedestal grill is provided in a picnic area, it shall comply with section 16.7. Proposed 16.7.1.2 requires that where multiple cooking surfaces, grills, or pedestal grills are provided in a picnic area, 50 percent, but no less than two, shall comply with 16.7. Of the 50 percent required to be accessible, 40 percent, but no less than two, shall be located along an outdoor recreation access route complying with 16.3. The rationale for this provision is consistent with picnic tables (16.5.1), fire rings (16.6.1) and other outdoor elements.

Proposed 16.7.2 requires accessible cooking surfaces, grills, and pedestal grills to be dispersed throughout the area and among the types provided. For example, if a picnic area offers different types of cooking surfaces, the total number of accessible cooking surfaces is to be distributed among the different types provided. This provision would not increase the number of cooking surfaces, grills, or pedestal grills required to be accessible per 16.7.1.

Proposed 16.7.3 requires accessible cooking surfaces be installed between 15 inches and 34 inches above the ground/floor. This provides a comfortable reach range for cooking. A 34 inch height is consistent with counter tops (ADAAG Appendix 9.2.2(7). The 15 inches is consistent with current ADAAG 4.2.5 for the minimum low forward reach.

Proposed 16.7.4 requires operating controls and mechanisms to comply with current ADAAG 4.27.1 (General), 4.27.2 (Clear Floor Space), and 4.27.3 (Height). In the outdoor recreation environment, picnic and camping elements must be vandal-resistant, large animal-resistant (i.e., bears) and adaptable to weather conditions of extreme heat, cold, and moisture. While compliance with ADAAG 4.27.4 (Operation) is reasonable and feasible in the indoor/built environment, it is not realistic in the outdoor environment. Therefore, compliance with ADAAG 4.27.4 is not required.

Proposed 16.7.5 requires that a minimum clear space of 48 inches deep by 48 inches wide be provide at all usable portions of the cooking surface, grill, or pedestal grill. This allows both a front and parallel approach. If at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies, exception 1 permits the clear space to be reduced to no less than 36 inches by 36 inches. This proposed provision is also consistent with fire rings (16.6.4).

Proposed 16.7.6 addresses the slope of the clear floor or ground space of cooking surfaces.As with picnic tables and fire rings, this proposed provision requires the slope of the clear space at usable portions of cooking surfaces, grills, and pedestal grills to not exceed 1:50 in any direction. If proper drainage can not be met with a 1:50 slope because of the type of surface used, exception 1 permits the slope of the clear space to be up to 1:33 in any direction. If at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 exists, exception 2 permits departure from 16.17.6.

Proposed 16.7.7 addresses surface of the clear floor or ground space of cooking surfaces. The surface of the clear space at usable portions of cooking surfaces, grills, and pedestal grills is required to be firm and stable. Exception 1 permits departure from this provision where at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 exists.

FIXED TRASH/RECYCLING CONTAINERS

Proposed 16.8 requires each trash or recycling container to be accessible and comply with ADAAG 4.27.

Proposed 16.8.1 requires that each trash or recycling container be accessible. The committee considered this to be a health issue making it imperative that each container meet the provisions for accessibility. This requirement is compatible with those for other singly occurring elements in an outdoor setting, as well as providing consistency with existing ADAAG. Exception 1 permits 50 percent of the bins in a multi-bin container to be exempt from this provision.

An exemption is provided where the container has one or more compartments. Here, 50 percent of the compartments must be accessible. The committee determined that this requirement would assure the user of finding at least one accessible compartment in a multi-bin container.

Proposed 16.8.2 requires the clear space of fixed trash/recycling containers to comply with ADAAG 4.2.4.1 and 4.2.4.2. This ensures sufficient clear space for use by persons using wheelchairs and other mobility devices.

Proposed 16.8.3 requires the surface of the clear space to be stable and firm. An exception permits departure from this provision where at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 exists. This provision does not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.8.4 requires the slope of the clear space to be no greater than 1:50. An exception permits a 1:33 slope for proper drainage. This provision does not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.8.5 requires operating controls for the containers to comply with ADAAG 4.27.3 and 4.27.4. However, an exemption from this requirement is provided where the container has a hinged, sliding or other cover and is situated where it is subject to large animal intrusion, thus dictating animal-resistant controls. Current designs for controls and operating mechanisms preclude providing secure storage of trash or recycled material from large animals, and still meet the reach and operating force requirements of ADAAG 4.27.4. Where problems exist with large animal intrusion, the necessity of protecting the health of the user and the animal populations override accessibility requirements.

WOOD STOVES/FIREPLACES

Proposed 16.9.1 requires each wood stove and fireplace to comply with this section. Wood stoves and fireplaces are designed and constructed to provide warmth to the user. Secondarily, they might also be used for cooking.

Proposed 16.9.2 requires that a clear space 48 inches deep minimum, and 48 inches wide minimum be provided from all usable portions of the wood stove or fireplace. This is consistent with space requirements for other elements in outdoor developed facilities, such as fire rings and grills. The 48 inch dimensional requirement allows for front and side approach. The committee agreed that the extra space required beyond current ADAAG requirement of 30 inches by 48 inches is warranted in this case where safety is paramount. An exception is provided to reduce this requirement to 36 inches minimum depth where one or more of the conditions in section 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.9.3 requires the controls for operation of wood stoves and fireplaces to comply with ADAAG 4.27. This is consistent with existing ADAAG.

Question 16. Are there controls and operating mechanisms for fireplaces available that will meet the requirements of ADAAG 4.27? If not, what modifications will allow for most operating mechanisms of woodstoves and fireplaces to meet this provision.

Proposed 16.9.4 requires the clear space slope in all directions be 1:50 maximum. Exception 1 allows for a 1:33 maximum for proper drainage. This requirement is consistent with other provisions in section 16. It also provides an element of safety for the operator so that the controls may be operated with minimal risk due to design. Exception 2 allows a departure from this provision where one or more of the conditions in 16.1.1 exist.

Proposed 16.9.5 requires the clear space surface to be firm and stable. This is consistent with other provisions of section and provides a safe place from which to operate the wood stove or fireplace. Where one or more of the conditions in 16.1.1 exist, this provision does not apply.

OVERLOOKS/VIEWING AREAS

Proposed 16.10.1 requires each viewing area, where provided, on designated overlooks to comply with 16.10.2 through 16.10.5. Accessible viewing areas are also required to be located on an outdoor recreation access route complying with 16.3 or a trail complying with 16.2.

Overlooks and viewing areas are specifically designed and constructed to provide an unobstructed observation of a vista or to a specific point of interest, such as the view to a mountain range or down into a valley or to a waterfall or geologic formation. As such, they are a destination for the user and should be accessible. An exception permits a minimum of one of each viewing opportunity for distinct points of interest where multiple viewing areas are provided.

Accessible viewing areas are also required to be located on an accessible trail or trail segment (16.2), or on an accessible outdoor recreation access route complying with 16.3. There are some rare configurations where the overlook or viewing area provides only a drive-up approach to the vista or distinct point of interest. As it is impossible to forecast the type of vehicle that would be used in such a place, the committee did not have adequate information to derive appropriate provisions to accommodate this type of area. Exception 2 permits departures from this provision where one or more of the conditions in 16.1.1 exist.

Proposed 16.10.2 requires at least one maneuvering space complying with ADAAG 4.2.3. This requirement is consistent with existing ADAAG and facilitates access to and movement away from the viewing area.

Proposed 16.10.3 requires that each location providing a viewing opportunity to one or more distinct point(s) of interest must have at least one unrestricted viewing area for each viewing opportunity. The committee felt that the attraction of a viewing area is to bring persons to a place where they can enjoy all the aspects of the site and persons with disabilities should have the opportunity to experience the attraction. The committee determined that an arc extending from 32 inches minimum above the level surface of the viewing area to 51 inches maximum above the surface would be sufficient to allow an unobstructed view. Often the overlook or the viewing area has an adjacent drop-off that would present a hazard to the user of the area. Safety barriers are often installed (such as a guardrail, railing and wall) to protect the visitor from the edge and may block the view. This provision requires an unobstructed view to the distinct point of interest. There must be a means by which a field of view in the described arc is obtained. Various designs or recommendations to manage this are provided in the appendix, and include see-through panels in walls or elevated platforms away from the guarded edge. A periscope, complying with 16.11.1, is also an option for a view over a barrier. This provision does not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.10.4 requires the slope of the maneuvering space not to exceed 1:50. An exception permits 1:33 maximum slope for drainage. This provision does not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.10.5 requires the surface of the clear space to be stable and firm. This provision does not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

TELESCOPES/PERISCOPES

Proposed 16.11.1 requires at least 20 percent, but never less than one, telescope or periscope to comply with 16.11.2 through 16.11.5, where provided. Where only one is provided, it shall comply with 16.11.2 through 16.11.3 and also be useable from the standing position.

Viewing areas or overlooks are sometimes equipped with mounted telescopes and less often with periscopes. The purpose of these elements is to provide the visitor with an even closer view of a distinct point of interest (rather than a vista). Where only one of either type of viewing device is provided, it shall comply with the technical provisions of this section and also be usable from the standing position. This configuration will provide accessibility and usability. Where more than one of the elements is present, at least 20 percent, but no less than one, shall be accessible.

Many existing sites only provide scopes usable from a standing position. This does not
accommodate the needs of people using wheelchairs, children, or people of shorter stature.
The committee made specific mention of children when discussing scopes, based on experiences of having to lift children to use scopes. Lifting may not be possible for people with back difficulty or insufficient strength to lift children.

Proposed 16.11.2 requires the controls and operating mechanisms of either the telescope or periscope to comply with ADAAG 4.27.

Proposed 16.11.3 requires the eye piece shall be usable from a seated position so that each distinct point of interest is viewable. This will provide the widest range of viewing opportunities, not only for seated individuals but also children. An appendix note is included with suggestions to accomplish this. Options include an adjustable scope mount, a swivel seat or installing an element that would allow for a high/low option similar to what is offered for water fountains. The requirement for use from the seated position is necessary for people using wheelchairs and other mobility devices. The committee recognized that this may also benefit use by children or individuals of short stature.

Proposed 16.11.4 requires the surface conditions of the clear space adjacent to the telescope/periscope to be firm and stable, along with other clear spaces for elements in section 16. In the interest of safety and the ability to use the elements in unchanging and balanced condition, a dependable surface condition is a necessity.

Proposed 16.11.5 requires the slope of the required clear space to not exceed 1:50 in any direction, unless the surface condition is such that drainage is a problem. Where drainage is of concern, a 1:33 maximum slope is permitted. Drainage from the area adjacent to the elements is essential to preserve the integrity of the surface condition and to provide a comfortable location to use the elements.

FIXED BENCHES

Proposed 16.12.1.1 requires that where only one fixed bench is provided, the bench shall comply with the provisions of 16.12.3 through 16.12.8. The committee felt that it was important that where only a single bench is provided, it must be usable by all visitors. This is generally consistent with ADAAG and with the other elements of this section. The single bench must be connected to an outdoor recreation access route and have at least one armrest complying with ADAAG 4.26.3 to facilitate its use.

The committee recognizes benches, when provided, are key elements in many outdoor settings, such as picnic areas or day use areas. They are used for a variety of purposes, including places of rest or relaxation, meeting spots, and places from which to view events such as sporting activities. Whatever the use, the committee determined that the bench or benches, where provided, should conform to the provisions stated. However, the benches that are parts of an assembly area are not addressed and need not conform to the provisions [see 4.1.3(19)].

Proposed 16.12.2.2 requires that where multiple fixed benches are placed in an area, at least 50 percent shall meet the proposed provisions in this section. This assures the visitor that there will be at least one bench available which meets ADAAG. Further, of the benches that are required to be accessible, 50 percent of those shall provide an armrest complying with 4.26.3. The committee felt that the visitor should be provided with a choice of bench configurations that would accommodate different needs. An armrest would not only provide support when occupying the bench, it would assist in transfer from the bench.

Proposed 16.12.2 requires dispersal of accessible benches. This provision does not require an increase in the total number of accessible benches. The dispersion of accessible benches throughout the area provides for a variety of settings and is consistent with other provisions in ADAAG.

Proposed 16.12.3 requires that the front edge of the bench seat to be between 17 inches minimum and 19 inches maximum above the ground or floor space to facilitate transfer. This provision is consistent with other ADAAG provisions where a height is required for transfer.

Proposed 16.12.4 requires the clear space for benches to comply with ADAAG 4.2.4, be located at one end of the accessible bench, and not overlap other clear space requirements. The committee debated the location of the clear space, recognizing that many different configurations could exist. The requirement of a clear space at one end without intruding into other clear spaces provides the users with the same perspective as the occupant of the bench, no matter which direction the bench is facing and avoids obstructing the outdoor recreation access route. Shoulder-to-shoulder alignment of the clear space enhances the opportunity for and ease of interaction conversation with someone seated on the bench.

Proposed 16.12.5 addresses back support. Back support is required to be provided, extending the full length of the bench.

Proposed 16.12.6 requires the surface of the clear space for the bench to be firm and stable. The provisions of 16.12.6 do not apply where at least one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Proposed 16.12.7 requires the slope of the clear space not to exceed 1:50 in any direction. An exception to the slope requirement permits a 1:33 maximum slope where the 1:50 slope does not allow proper drainage. It is important for the stability of the occupant of the clear space that the surface condition provides adequate support. The provisions of 16.12.7 do not apply where one of the conditions in 16.1.1 exists.

Where required by 16.12.2, at least one armrest is required on a single bench. All armrests must comply with ADAAG 4.26.3. This will facilitate transfer to the bench and provide support to maneuver to or from the bench seat.

UTILITY SINKS (DEEP)

A utility sink (deep) is a sink that has a vertical dimension deeper within the confines of the sink than the standard lavatory basin, and allows the user of a picnic area or campground setting to clean large pots or equipment. It has the general configuration of a sink found in a custodial maintenance area.

Proposed 16.13.1 requires that where utility sinks are provided, at least 5 percent, but not less than one, shall be accessible. An accessible utility sink or sinks shall also be located in an accessible room or space. This is consistent with ADAAG.

Proposed 16.13.2 requires a clear space complying with 4.2.4 be provided for the sink for adequate reach and maneuvering spaces. This is consistent with ADAAG. Proposed 16.13.3 requires that the clear space not have a slope greater than 1:50. An exception permits the slope of the clear space to be 1:33 maximum to provide proper drainage. Proposed 16.13.4 requires that the surface of the clear floor space be firm and stable.

Proposed 16.13.5 height and 16.13.6 depth refer to the reach ranges of ADAAG. The committee recognizes that there may be some difficulty in providing a deep enough sink to accomplish the purposes of cleaning larger pots or pans used given current reach range requirements. However, the committee believed that adhering to the established reach ranges was important. The controls and operating mechanisms for utility sinks are required to comply with ADAAG 4.27.3 and 4.27.4.

MOBILITY DEVICE STORAGE FACILITIES

The committee addressed the need for storage space for mobility devices primarily in the setting where an individual using a wheelchair or other mobility assistive device must transfer from that to another device or vehicle in order to take advantage of the services or programs offered at the outdoor facility. A ski facility where individuals may use an adaptive ski to participate, is an example where this type of element may be provided. The committee believed that where storage facilities are provided for protecting personal assistive devices from environmental effects or theft/vandalism, at least one storage facility must meet the technical provisions of this section. Proposed 16.14 requires that where storage facilities are provided, at least one shall comply with 16.14.2 through 16.14.6.

Proposed 16.14.2 requires the size of the storage space be 38 inches minimum in height, 28 inches minimum inches in width and 40 inches minimum in length. These dimensions are based on the space needed for a collapsed standard adult wheelchair. The committee agreed that a wheelchair would be the most commonly occurring device which would require storage and based the requirements accordingly.

Proposed 16.14.3 through 16.14.4 requires the clear space (complying with ADAAG 4.2.4 for a parallel approach). Proposed 16.14.4 requires the required clear space surface to be firm and stable. This is consistent with other requirements of section 16. These requirements provide the minimum spaces necessary to facilitate use of the provided storage space.

Proposed 16.14.5 addresses the slope of the clear space. This provision relates to the usability of the storage area, especially as the element is associated with transfer. Thus the requirement is for a 1:50 slope maximum, unless the surface condition is such that proper drainage requires a 1:33 maximum slope.

Proposed 16.14.6 requires controls and operating mechanisms for accessible mobility storage facilities to comply with ADAAG 4.27.3 and 4.27.4.

FIXED PIT TOILETS

Pit toilets are very primitive outhouses, and may consist simply of holes dug in the ground covered by a toilet riser. The riser may or may not be surrounded by walls and a roof. Pit toilets are generally located in remote, undeveloped areas, and are provided primarily for resource protection rather than visitor convenience and comfort. Pit toilets may be permanent installations, or may be moved from one location to another as the hole is filled or the area becomes overly impacted from use. These provisions apply to fixed pit toilets.

Proposed 16.15.1requires each fixed pit toilet to comply with the technical provisions of 16.15, since usually only one pit toilet is provided in an area. This scoping is consistent with what would be required for other singly occurring elements.

Proposed 16.15.2 requires a minimum clear space of 60 inches by 60 inches adjacent to the toilet. Where one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies, exception 1 permits the size clear space to be reduced to 48 inches by 48 inches. Where a 48 inch by 48 inch clear space can not be provided because at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies, exception 2 permits departure from 16.15.2.

Proposed 16.15.3 requires the height of the pit toilet riser to comply with current ADAAG 4.16.3. No departures for the outdoor environment were necessary.

Proposed 16.15.4 is consistent with current ADAAG, and requires the slope of the clear space at pit toilets to be 1:50 maximum in any direction. As with other picnic and camping elements, exception 1 would permit the slope to be 1:33 maximum to ensure proper drainage. In exception 2, this provision would not apply where at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 is present.

Proposed 16.15.5 requires grab bars complying with current ADAAG 4.16.4 only where the pit toilets are provided with walls. Since many pit toilets consist of a riser placed on the ground, the committee agreed that the requirement for grab bars should only be triggered if a structure (i.e., walls) surrounds the riser.

Proposed 16.15.6requires the surface of the clear space to be firm and stable. This provision would not be required where at least one of the conditions of 16.1.1 applies.

UTILITIES

Proposed 16.16.1 requires utilities such as electric, water, sewage and other similar type utilities serving accessible elements to comply with 16.16.2 through 16.16.5. Proposed 16.16.2 requires controls and operating mechanisms associated with utilities to comply with ADAAG 4.27. Exception 1 does not apply 4.27.3 and 4.27.4 to sewage hookups.

Exception 2 permits departure from ADAAG 4.27.4 for hand pumps. Because of the way a hand pump works and is designed, technology does not yet exist that will allow hand pumps to be operated at a force that would be considered accessible. The rationale for not requiring sewer hook ups to meet height and reach range provision is based on their ground level location necessary for gravity drainage. Most are foot drains or have a small handle at the ground level to open the connection to the system.

Proposed 16.16.3 requires fixed water spouts to be located 28 inches minimum to 36 inches maximum above the ground or floor surface and shall be centered at the edge of a 60 inches minimum by 60 inches minimum clear space.

Proposed 16.16.4 requires the slopes of clear spaces required by 16.16.2 and 16.16.3 to have a 1:50 maximum slope in any direction. Where surface conditions require a slope greater than 1:50 for proper drainage, an exception permits a 1:33 maximum slope.

Proposed 16.16.5 requires the surface of the clear space required by 16.16.2 and 16.16.3 to be stable and firm.

CAMPING FACILITIES

Proposed 16.17 requires camping spaces (e.g. RV spaces and trailer spaces, tent spaces, camping shelters or tent pads and tent platforms), where provided, to be accessible according to section 16.17. Proposed 16.17.1 requires accessible camping spaces to be provided in accordance with table 16.17. Table 16.17 requires the number of accessible campsites and is based on the total number of spaces provided. This table was developed as a result of the deliberations of the committee, using existing ADA scoping for transient lodging as a reference.

Modifications to the existing transient-lodging scoping were made to create higher numbers of accessible campsites in the low range and more accessible campsites in each of three basic camping styles (i.e. RV, tent, and cabin/shelter). Each camping style category must achieve the proper scoping independently of the others.

The proposed scoping provisions require higher accessibility where lower numbers of features are provided. This was extensively debated among committee members and intended to address the higher probability of utilization where low numbers of elements are provided. As an example, the chance of two picnic tables being occupied at the same time and place is much higher than five picnic tables being occupied at the same time, even though the demand may increase proportionately to the number of tables offered.

The other departure from ADAAG scoping for accessible transient lodging is the division of campsites into three categories: RV & Trailer Spaces, Tent Spaces, and Camping Shelters or Cabins. Campsite use requires specific equipment and a specially designed area may not be suitable for every use. An example might be if someone comes prepared to use a tent, they may not be able to use a paved RV site. This was also a way to increase the number of accessible sites provided.

Proposed 16.17.1 also addresses other camping elements provided in accessible camping spaces. To ensure usability, all elements that are provided as a part of an accessible campsite must meet the technical requirements as outlined in this section. Elements provided in campgrounds are only required to be accessible in the accessible campsites.

Proposed 16.17.1.1 requires RV spaces and trailer spaces required to be accessible to comply with the technical provisions of 16.17.2.1 An exception is included where camping spaces are designed for both tent camping and recreational vehicle or camping trailer use. In this case, at least 50 percent of the accessible multi-use spaces shall comply with 16.17.2.1 and the remainder are permitted to be reduced to16 feet minimum.

Proposed 16.17.1.2 requires that where camping spaces are designed for use for tent camping and camping shelters, accessible tent and camping shelters shall comply with 16.17.2.2.

Proposed 16.17.1.3 address identification. Identification of accessible campsite by an International Symbol of Accessibility (ISA) was determined to be necessary where campsite occupancy and site selection is made by user and is based on a first come, first served basis. To accommodate campground operations that assign sites either through a reservation service or upon arrival, the ISA is not required and an exception was created to accommodate this distinction. It was determined that site assignment would create better utilization of accessible sites than the use of ISA signage. Signage is also not required where all sites are accessible.

Proposed 16.17.2 addresses accessible camping space parking Proposed 16.17.2.1 requires accessible RV camp vehicle spaces and trailer camping spaces to be 20 feet minimum in width . This was determined to be necessary to accommodate existing equipment manufactured by the RV industry and lifts required to gain access out of and into this equipment. The extra width associated with this site is necessary to provide a 3 foot access on the driver's side for access to utilities. The parking space is 9 foot to allow for vehicle width and an 8 foot space on the passenger side for deployment of lift with room to exit conveniently. An exception permits one space to 16 feet minimum ins width, where only two accessible parking spaces are required. The exception allows a smaller parking pad (van size) for the second accessible campsite on very small remote campgrounds. This deviation will limit impact on the environment and the user's experience.

Proposed 16.17.2.2 addresses tent camping spaces and shelter camping spaces. Where parking is provided, a tent camping and camping shelter parking space of 16 feet is required and follows the current guidelines for ADAAG van accessible parking spaces which would accommodate the maximum size vehicle used for this type of campsite. A "shelter" also includes cabin accommodations.

Proposed 16.17.2.3 requires the slope of the accessible parking space does not exceed 1:50 in any direction.. Where surface conditions require a greater slope for proper drainage, an exception permits a 1:33 maximum slope.

Proposed 16.17.3 addresses tent pads and tent platforms. Proposed 16.17.3.1 addresses clear ground space. A 48 inch clear space around the tent pad is required to allow both side and front approach access to assembling equipment. Exception 1 allows the clear ground space to be reduced to 36 inches where at least one of the conditions in 16.1.1 applies.

Proposed 16.17.3.2 requires the tent pad surface to be firm and stable, consistent with other provisions in section 16. An exception permits departure from 16.17.3.2 where at least one of the four conditions specified in 16.1.1 exist.

Proposed 16.17.3.3 requires the tent platform surface to be stable and firm.

Proposed 16.17.3.4 requires the slope of the tent pad or platform to be 1:50 maximum and is consistent with other ADAAG requirements. An exception allows slope to be a 1:33 maximum in any direction to accommodate drainage on a packed surface. This exception is consistent with other outdoor recreation elements.

Proposed 16.17.3.5 requires edge protection to be 3 inches minimum where the raised tent platform is provided. The 3 inch minimum is necessary is to ensure visibility and to prevent wheelchairs and other mobility devices from rolling off the raised platform.

Proposed 16.17.3.6 addresses the connection where a tent platform is raised above grade to provide a level surface to pitch a tent. Access is provided in a similar fashion to playground equipment by a transfer system of a platform and transfer steps. The need for mobility equipment on the platform surface was not deemed to be necessary for use, as the surface area is the same size as the tent.

Proposed 16.17.4 address additional campground parking. Where RV spaces or trailer spaces are provided, at least one shall comply with 16.17.4.1 through 16.17.1.3 Accessible recreational vehicle spaces in general parking are necessary to accommodate short-term parking needs. The exception separates campsite parking from general parking. This requirement provides a special RV parking space in addition to current ADAAG scoping for parking areas.

Proposed 16.17.4.1 requires accessible recreational vehicle parking spaces to be minimum width of 12 feet.

Proposed 16.17.4.2 addresses access aisles. A parking space of 12 feet allows for 9 feet wide vehicle with 3 feet access on driver side, and extend the full length of the space. Access aisle of 8 feet allows for lift deployment and egress from lift.

Proposed 16.17.4.3 requires the slope of the accessible parking spaces to not exceed 1:50 in any direction. An exception permits a 1:33 maximum slope where necessary for proper drainage.

WARMING HUT

Proposed 16.18 addresses warming huts. Proposed 16.18 requires each warming hut to have a turning space complying with ADAAG 4.2.3. Doors and other elements associated with a warming hut are already addressed by ADAAG. ADAAG 4.2.3 requires a maneuvering space inside the warming hut.

OUTDOOR RINSING SHOWERS

Proposed 16.19 addresses outdoor rinsing showers. Section 16.19 addresses the scoping and technical provisions for outdoor rinsing showers. The committee recognized that current ADAAG references shower stalls in 4.21. However, the description and provisions are clearly for indoor facilities. Although certain portions of ADAAG 4.21 are applicable, other parts would not be applicable for an outdoor shower stall or rinsing shower, typically found at a beach or at camping facilities, since the current ADAAG requires both grab bars and a seat for these shower stalls designated as accessible. Current ADAAG references shower stalls and not showers and reflects a design where walls are present. This is not always the case in outdoor showers. Therefore, the committee recommended that specifications for an outdoor shower should be developed, with reference to current ADAAG where appropriate. In order to distinguish this type of shower from those already addressed in ADAAG, the committee used the term "outdoor rinsing shower". An appendix note has been added to further identify what is considered a rinsing shower.

Proposed 16.19 addresses the minimum number for outdoor rinsing showers. The committee examined several ways to scope showers, considering a percentage formula, a chart similar to parking or telephones, and a minimum number. Because the committee ultimately recommend two types of outdoor rinsing showers, a low and high version, the committee recommended that a minimum number, one of each type, where rinsing showers are provided at a location. If only one is provided, it must be a dual shower.

Proposed 16.19.1 addresses the requirements for a low outdoor rinsing shower. The appropriate height for a low rinsing shower is taken from the current requirements for indoor showers. ADAAG 4.21.6 for indoor showers provides that in un-monitored facilities where the threat of vandalism is a consideration, a fixed show head mounted at 48 inches above the shower floor may be used in lieu of a hand-held shower head. In order to provide flexibility and a range, rather than an absolute mounting height, the committee recommended a range of 48 inches to 54 inches. A hand-held shower spray unit is permitted, although the committee realized that this would be an infrequent choice in an outdoor environment due to vandalism concerns.

Proposed 16.19.1.2 to 16.19.1.5 addresses the requirements for grab bars. Grab bars are typically not found in outdoor showers, primarily because the majority of the showers are free-standing poles and there is no place to mount a grab bar which conforms with current ADAAG. Nonetheless, the committee believed that a grab bar was essential for stability in a wet environment, but not for transfer. The committee also recommended providing three options for the grab bar: vertical, circular (if the shower is on a pole), and horizontal, (if the shower is on a wall). If a vertical grab bar is chosen, outlined in 16.19.1.3, it would be permitted only on a post. There is no comparable current ADAAG provision. The committee recommended a length which would be provided 33 inches above the floor, the lowest height currently for a grab bar, and extend the length of the pole within 3 inches below the shower head. If a circular grab bar is chosen, outlined in 16.19.1.4, it would also be permitted only on a post. This type of grab bar would resemble a spoked wheel mounted perpendicular to the post. The committee recommended that the grab bar be provided 33 to 36 inches above the floor, consistent with a horizontal grab bar in an indoor shower. If a horizontal grab bar is chosen, outlined in 16.19.1.5, the committee recommended a 33 inches to 36 inches mounting height for horizontal grab bars, consistent with the mounting height for horizontal grab bars in indoor showers.

Proposed 16.19.1.6 addresses the requirements for controls. In order for controls to be usable, they must be within reach ranges and be operable. Since there is nothing to suggest that the current reach ranges in ADAAG are inappropriate, the committee recommended that controls comply with 4.27. Although some people suggested a 48 inch maximum regardless of approach, the current ADAAG would appear to be practical if a turning radius is permitted. Many showers have a twist-type knob outdoors because those controls are less subject to vandalism. Although vandalism is a legitimate concern in outdoor settings, the members agreed that accessible controls could be vandal-proofed, particularly if push controls are used. The current requirement need not be changed. The committee recommended that controls and operating mechanism comply with ADAAG 4.27. If self-closing controls are used, the controls shall remain open for at least 10 seconds, the minimum time needed for rinsing.

Proposed 16.19.1.7 addresses the requirement for clear space. A clear floor space which would permit a front or parallel approach is necessary in order to make the shower usable. For most elements, such as a telephone or drinking fountain, a 30 x 48 inch clear floor space would suffice. Committee members agreed that only providing a front nor parallel approach without the 5 foot turnaround space would not allow someone in a wheelchair to turn 360 degrees to rinse off under all angles of the water. For ease and convenience of use for people using wheelchairs, the full turn around space must be provided.

Proposed 16.19.1.8 addresses the requirement for slope. The committee recommended that the slope of the clear space not exceed 1:33 in all directions. This deviates from current ADAAG but is consistent with recommendations by the committee for other outdoor elements where drainage is a concern. Many park maintenance managers indicated that a 1:20 slope is required for the floors of outdoor toilets to ensure proper drainage. The committee believed that the increase to 1:33 would suffice and allow for a reasonable tolerance.

Proposed 16.19.2 addresses the requirement for the height of a high outdoor rinsing shower. 16.19 2.4 requires the height of the shower head to be 72 inches minimum, the standard height for all showers. A hand-held shower spray is permitted.

Proposed 16.19.2.2 to 16.19.2.5 addresses the requirements for grab bars. The requirements options for installing grab bars in a high rinsing shower are identical to those for a low rinsing shower.

Proposed 16.19.2.6 addresses controls 4.27.4 and proposed 16.19.2.7 addresses drainage for the high rinsing shower. These provisions are consistent with requirements for low rinsing showers.

The committee also discussed shower seats. Indoor showers which are designated as accessible require a seat. This requirement would not be reasonable for an outdoor shower. An adjacent bench might be conveniently located for the placement of items, but not in conjunction with showering itself with an outdoor pole shower, there is no adjacent wall to which to mount a fold-down seat. In an outdoor shower mounted to a wall, a fold-down bench would likely be vandalized. Therefore, the committee recommended no requirements for a shower seat for an outdoor rinsing shower.

OTHER ISSUES

The committee did not complete its discussions and recommendations on several outdoor elements. In some cases, they were awaiting the proposed changes for ADAAG prior to addressing the elements. Unfortunately, this work was not published prior to the completion of their work. These elements included drinking fountains, assembly areas (exterior facilities), exterior public telephones, scoping for toilet rooms, self-service fee depositories, and kiosks and interpretive displays.

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